Group vocal patterns and leadership in India: Effects of Task, Language, and Sex of Subjects

Richard Barry Ruback, James M. Dabbs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was concerned with the effects of language and sex of subjection social and task conversations among university students in India. Each of 20 same-sex 5-person groups, 10 male and 10 female, participated in three 10-minute discussions. The social conversation was in English or Telugu and the two task discussions were in English and Telugu, in counterbalanced order. Results showed more talking and simultaneous speech in Telugu than in English discussions. Although leaders talked more than nonleaders, the correlation was lower than that found in the United States. Analyses suggest that, cross-culturally, leadership is more highly correlated with turns, which consist of both talking and silence, rather than with talking alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)446-464
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

Fingerprint

India
Language
leadership
conversation
language
Group
Students
leader
human being
university
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology

Cite this

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Group vocal patterns and leadership in India : Effects of Task, Language, and Sex of Subjects. / Ruback, Richard Barry; Dabbs, James M.

In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.01.1988, p. 446-464.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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