Growing population and ecosystem change increase human schistosomiasis around Lake Malaŵi

Bert Van Bocxlaer, Christian Albrecht, Jay R. Stauffer

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Multiple anthropogenic environmental stressors with reinforcing effects to the deterioration of ecosystem stability can obscure links between ecosystem change and the prevalence of infectious diseases. Incomplete understanding may lead to ineffective public health and disease control strategies, as appears to be the case with increased urogenital schistosomiasis in humans around Lake Malaŵi over recent decades. Sedimentation and eutrophication help explain historical changes in intermediate host range and parasite transmission. Hence, control strategies should account for abiotic changes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-220
Number of pages4
JournalTrends in Parasitology
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

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