Growth hormone does not attenuate the inhibitory effects of sepsis on wound healing

Jason Stamm, Robert N. Cooney, George O. Maish, Margaret L. Shumate, Charles H. Lang, H. Paul Ehrlich, Thomas C. Vary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic abdominal sepsis is associated with impaired tissue repair. Treatment of burn patients with growth hormone results in improved healing of skin graft donor sites. The goal of this study was to determine whether administration of growth hormone could attenuate the inhibitory effects of sepsis on cutaneous wound healing. Four groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: control, control + growth hormone, sepsis, and sepsis + growth hormone. Sepsis was caused by implantation of a bacterial focus in the peritoneal cavity. Control animals underwent sham laparotomy, and polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants were placed in subdermal pockets in all animals. Saline or growth hormone (400 μg) was injected subcutaneously every 12 hours. On day 5, the incisional wounds and polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants were harvested. The breaking strength of abdominal incisions was measured. Granulation tissue penetration and quality were determined by scoring polyvinyl alcohol sponge implant histology from 1 to 4 in a blinded fashion. Collagen deposition in polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants was quantitated by hydroxyproline assay. Septic mortality was not altered by growth hormone administration. Septic animals showed a reduction in food consumption for 2 days after surgery (p < 0.05 vs. controls), which was not affected by growth hormone administration. The breaking strength of incisional wounds and hydroxyproline content of polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants was reduced in septic rats (p < 0.001 vs. controls) but administration of growth hormone for 5 days did not improve breaking strength or collagen deposition in either group. We conclude that the administration of growth hormone for 5 days did not improve collage n deposition or breaking strength in cutaneous wounds from control or septic animals. The results suggest that growth hormone treatment is unlikely to improve tissue repair in sepsis-induced catabolic illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-109
Number of pages7
JournalWound Repair and Regeneration
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2000

Fingerprint

Wound Healing
Growth Hormone
Sepsis
Polyvinyl Alcohol
Hydroxyproline
Skin
Wounds and Injuries
Collagen
Granulation Tissue
Peritoneal Cavity
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Laparotomy
Sprague Dawley Rats
Histology
ivalon sponge
Tissue Donors
Transplants
Food
Mortality
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Stamm, Jason ; Cooney, Robert N. ; Maish, George O. ; Shumate, Margaret L. ; Lang, Charles H. ; Ehrlich, H. Paul ; Vary, Thomas C. / Growth hormone does not attenuate the inhibitory effects of sepsis on wound healing. In: Wound Repair and Regeneration. 2000 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 103-109.
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abstract = "Chronic abdominal sepsis is associated with impaired tissue repair. Treatment of burn patients with growth hormone results in improved healing of skin graft donor sites. The goal of this study was to determine whether administration of growth hormone could attenuate the inhibitory effects of sepsis on cutaneous wound healing. Four groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: control, control + growth hormone, sepsis, and sepsis + growth hormone. Sepsis was caused by implantation of a bacterial focus in the peritoneal cavity. Control animals underwent sham laparotomy, and polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants were placed in subdermal pockets in all animals. Saline or growth hormone (400 μg) was injected subcutaneously every 12 hours. On day 5, the incisional wounds and polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants were harvested. The breaking strength of abdominal incisions was measured. Granulation tissue penetration and quality were determined by scoring polyvinyl alcohol sponge implant histology from 1 to 4 in a blinded fashion. Collagen deposition in polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants was quantitated by hydroxyproline assay. Septic mortality was not altered by growth hormone administration. Septic animals showed a reduction in food consumption for 2 days after surgery (p < 0.05 vs. controls), which was not affected by growth hormone administration. The breaking strength of incisional wounds and hydroxyproline content of polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants was reduced in septic rats (p < 0.001 vs. controls) but administration of growth hormone for 5 days did not improve breaking strength or collagen deposition in either group. We conclude that the administration of growth hormone for 5 days did not improve collage n deposition or breaking strength in cutaneous wounds from control or septic animals. The results suggest that growth hormone treatment is unlikely to improve tissue repair in sepsis-induced catabolic illness.",
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Growth hormone does not attenuate the inhibitory effects of sepsis on wound healing. / Stamm, Jason; Cooney, Robert N.; Maish, George O.; Shumate, Margaret L.; Lang, Charles H.; Ehrlich, H. Paul; Vary, Thomas C.

In: Wound Repair and Regeneration, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.03.2000, p. 103-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Stamm, Jason

AU - Cooney, Robert N.

AU - Maish, George O.

AU - Shumate, Margaret L.

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AU - Ehrlich, H. Paul

AU - Vary, Thomas C.

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N2 - Chronic abdominal sepsis is associated with impaired tissue repair. Treatment of burn patients with growth hormone results in improved healing of skin graft donor sites. The goal of this study was to determine whether administration of growth hormone could attenuate the inhibitory effects of sepsis on cutaneous wound healing. Four groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: control, control + growth hormone, sepsis, and sepsis + growth hormone. Sepsis was caused by implantation of a bacterial focus in the peritoneal cavity. Control animals underwent sham laparotomy, and polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants were placed in subdermal pockets in all animals. Saline or growth hormone (400 μg) was injected subcutaneously every 12 hours. On day 5, the incisional wounds and polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants were harvested. The breaking strength of abdominal incisions was measured. Granulation tissue penetration and quality were determined by scoring polyvinyl alcohol sponge implant histology from 1 to 4 in a blinded fashion. Collagen deposition in polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants was quantitated by hydroxyproline assay. Septic mortality was not altered by growth hormone administration. Septic animals showed a reduction in food consumption for 2 days after surgery (p < 0.05 vs. controls), which was not affected by growth hormone administration. The breaking strength of incisional wounds and hydroxyproline content of polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants was reduced in septic rats (p < 0.001 vs. controls) but administration of growth hormone for 5 days did not improve breaking strength or collagen deposition in either group. We conclude that the administration of growth hormone for 5 days did not improve collage n deposition or breaking strength in cutaneous wounds from control or septic animals. The results suggest that growth hormone treatment is unlikely to improve tissue repair in sepsis-induced catabolic illness.

AB - Chronic abdominal sepsis is associated with impaired tissue repair. Treatment of burn patients with growth hormone results in improved healing of skin graft donor sites. The goal of this study was to determine whether administration of growth hormone could attenuate the inhibitory effects of sepsis on cutaneous wound healing. Four groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: control, control + growth hormone, sepsis, and sepsis + growth hormone. Sepsis was caused by implantation of a bacterial focus in the peritoneal cavity. Control animals underwent sham laparotomy, and polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants were placed in subdermal pockets in all animals. Saline or growth hormone (400 μg) was injected subcutaneously every 12 hours. On day 5, the incisional wounds and polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants were harvested. The breaking strength of abdominal incisions was measured. Granulation tissue penetration and quality were determined by scoring polyvinyl alcohol sponge implant histology from 1 to 4 in a blinded fashion. Collagen deposition in polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants was quantitated by hydroxyproline assay. Septic mortality was not altered by growth hormone administration. Septic animals showed a reduction in food consumption for 2 days after surgery (p < 0.05 vs. controls), which was not affected by growth hormone administration. The breaking strength of incisional wounds and hydroxyproline content of polyvinyl alcohol sponge implants was reduced in septic rats (p < 0.001 vs. controls) but administration of growth hormone for 5 days did not improve breaking strength or collagen deposition in either group. We conclude that the administration of growth hormone for 5 days did not improve collage n deposition or breaking strength in cutaneous wounds from control or septic animals. The results suggest that growth hormone treatment is unlikely to improve tissue repair in sepsis-induced catabolic illness.

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