Guided wave resonance tuning for pipe inspection

James Barshinger, Joseph L. Rose, Michael J. Avioli

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tremendous interest has surfaced recently on the use of guided waves in pipe inspection in the oil, chemical, and power generating industries. Relatively long lengths of piping can be inspected for corrosion and cracking from a single probe position. This saves a great deal of time and money compared to using more standard point-by-point normal beam inspection procedures. Pipes can be inspected without removing insulation or tar coatings by controlling the guided wave modes and frequencies used to carry out the study. This paper will review the history and state of the art of the guided wave techniques in piping. Benefits and limitations of the various methods will be pointed out along with a vision of future directions in the area of pipe and elbow inspection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-62
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pressure Vessels and Piping Division (Publication) PVP
Volume450
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 31 2002
EventThe 2002 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference: NDE Engineering Applications - Vancouver, BC, Canada
Duration: Aug 5 2002Aug 9 2002

Fingerprint

Guided electromagnetic wave propagation
Tuning
Inspection
Pipe
Tar
Insulation
Corrosion
Coatings
Industry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

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Guided wave resonance tuning for pipe inspection. / Barshinger, James; Rose, Joseph L.; Avioli, Michael J.

In: American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pressure Vessels and Piping Division (Publication) PVP, Vol. 450, 31.12.2002, p. 49-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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