Habitat characteristics and revised gap landscape analysis for the northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus), a state endangered species in Pennsylvania

Carolyn G. Mahan, Joseph A. Bishop, Michael A. Steele, Gregory Turner, Wayne L. Myers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We quantified the habitat characteristics associated with capture sites (20032006) of the state endangered northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) in Pennsylvania to develop management recommendations that help ensure its continued persistence in the Appalachians. In addition, we used this refined understanding of northern flying squirrel habitat to update the Pennsylvania Gap analysis model for this species. We examined habitat at both the landscape and local level and determined that northern flying squirrels preferred sites that contained mature (>95 y old) mixed coniferous forests and were adjacent to a permanent water source. In addition, sites where northern flying squirrels were captured contained significantly more overstory trees (all species), saplings and rock cover. After using these data to refine the Pennsylvania Gap model for northern flying squirrels, we reduced the primary or core habitat predicted for this species in the state by 90. Our findings further support the reliance of this species on specialized habitat in the Appalachians and help reinforce the need to conserve and manage mature mixed-coniferous forest stands, which are threatened by exotic pests and human development throughout the region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-295
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Midland Naturalist
Volume164
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010

Fingerprint

Glaucomys sabrinus
endangered species
habitat
habitats
coniferous forest
mixed forest
Appalachian region
mixed forests
coniferous forests
overstory
sapling
human development
saplings
forest stands
persistence
analysis
rocks
pests
rock

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

@article{023bf23f5e7b456494b3ec048ae95de3,
title = "Habitat characteristics and revised gap landscape analysis for the northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus), a state endangered species in Pennsylvania",
abstract = "We quantified the habitat characteristics associated with capture sites (20032006) of the state endangered northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) in Pennsylvania to develop management recommendations that help ensure its continued persistence in the Appalachians. In addition, we used this refined understanding of northern flying squirrel habitat to update the Pennsylvania Gap analysis model for this species. We examined habitat at both the landscape and local level and determined that northern flying squirrels preferred sites that contained mature (>95 y old) mixed coniferous forests and were adjacent to a permanent water source. In addition, sites where northern flying squirrels were captured contained significantly more overstory trees (all species), saplings and rock cover. After using these data to refine the Pennsylvania Gap model for northern flying squirrels, we reduced the primary or core habitat predicted for this species in the state by 90. Our findings further support the reliance of this species on specialized habitat in the Appalachians and help reinforce the need to conserve and manage mature mixed-coniferous forest stands, which are threatened by exotic pests and human development throughout the region.",
author = "Mahan, {Carolyn G.} and Bishop, {Joseph A.} and Steele, {Michael A.} and Gregory Turner and Myers, {Wayne L.}",
year = "2010",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1674/0003-0031-164.2.283",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "164",
pages = "283--295",
journal = "American Midland Naturalist",
issn = "0003-0031",
publisher = "University of Notre Dame",
number = "2",

}

Habitat characteristics and revised gap landscape analysis for the northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus), a state endangered species in Pennsylvania. / Mahan, Carolyn G.; Bishop, Joseph A.; Steele, Michael A.; Turner, Gregory; Myers, Wayne L.

In: American Midland Naturalist, Vol. 164, No. 2, 01.10.2010, p. 283-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Habitat characteristics and revised gap landscape analysis for the northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus), a state endangered species in Pennsylvania

AU - Mahan, Carolyn G.

AU - Bishop, Joseph A.

AU - Steele, Michael A.

AU - Turner, Gregory

AU - Myers, Wayne L.

PY - 2010/10/1

Y1 - 2010/10/1

N2 - We quantified the habitat characteristics associated with capture sites (20032006) of the state endangered northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) in Pennsylvania to develop management recommendations that help ensure its continued persistence in the Appalachians. In addition, we used this refined understanding of northern flying squirrel habitat to update the Pennsylvania Gap analysis model for this species. We examined habitat at both the landscape and local level and determined that northern flying squirrels preferred sites that contained mature (>95 y old) mixed coniferous forests and were adjacent to a permanent water source. In addition, sites where northern flying squirrels were captured contained significantly more overstory trees (all species), saplings and rock cover. After using these data to refine the Pennsylvania Gap model for northern flying squirrels, we reduced the primary or core habitat predicted for this species in the state by 90. Our findings further support the reliance of this species on specialized habitat in the Appalachians and help reinforce the need to conserve and manage mature mixed-coniferous forest stands, which are threatened by exotic pests and human development throughout the region.

AB - We quantified the habitat characteristics associated with capture sites (20032006) of the state endangered northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) in Pennsylvania to develop management recommendations that help ensure its continued persistence in the Appalachians. In addition, we used this refined understanding of northern flying squirrel habitat to update the Pennsylvania Gap analysis model for this species. We examined habitat at both the landscape and local level and determined that northern flying squirrels preferred sites that contained mature (>95 y old) mixed coniferous forests and were adjacent to a permanent water source. In addition, sites where northern flying squirrels were captured contained significantly more overstory trees (all species), saplings and rock cover. After using these data to refine the Pennsylvania Gap model for northern flying squirrels, we reduced the primary or core habitat predicted for this species in the state by 90. Our findings further support the reliance of this species on specialized habitat in the Appalachians and help reinforce the need to conserve and manage mature mixed-coniferous forest stands, which are threatened by exotic pests and human development throughout the region.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77957352769&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77957352769&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1674/0003-0031-164.2.283

DO - 10.1674/0003-0031-164.2.283

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:77957352769

VL - 164

SP - 283

EP - 295

JO - American Midland Naturalist

JF - American Midland Naturalist

SN - 0003-0031

IS - 2

ER -