Hairworm anti-predator strategy

A study of causes and consequences

F. Ponton, C. Lebarbenchon, T. Lefèvre, F. Thomas, D. Duneau, L. Marché, L. Renault, David Peter Hughes, D. G. Biron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the most fascinating anti-predator responses displayed by parasites is that of hairworms (Nematomorpha). Following the ingestion of the insect host by fish or frogs, the parasitic worm is able to actively exit both its host and the gut of the predator. Using as a model the hairworm, Paragordius tricuspidatus, (parasitizing the cricket Nemobius sylvestris) and the fish predator Micropterus salmoïdes, we explored, with proteomics tools, the physiological basis of this anti-predator response. By examining the proteome of the parasitic worm, we detected a differential expression of 27 protein spots in those worms able to escape the predator. Peptide Mass Fingerprints of candidate protein spots suggest the existence of an intense muscular activity in escaping worms, which functions in parallel with their distinctive biology. In a second step, we attempted to determine whether the energy expended by worms to escape the predator is traded off against its reproductive potential. Remarkably, the number of offspring produced by worms having escaped a predator was not reduced compared with controls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)631-638
Number of pages8
JournalParasitology
Volume133
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

Fingerprint

Nematomorpha
Helminths
predators
Fishes
Gryllidae
Bass
Peptide Mapping
Proteome
Anura
Proteomics
Insects
helminths
Parasites
Proteins
Eating
Micropterus
proteome
fish
proteomics
frogs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Ponton, F., Lebarbenchon, C., Lefèvre, T., Thomas, F., Duneau, D., Marché, L., ... Biron, D. G. (2006). Hairworm anti-predator strategy: A study of causes and consequences. Parasitology, 133(5), 631-638. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0031182006000904
Ponton, F. ; Lebarbenchon, C. ; Lefèvre, T. ; Thomas, F. ; Duneau, D. ; Marché, L. ; Renault, L. ; Hughes, David Peter ; Biron, D. G. / Hairworm anti-predator strategy : A study of causes and consequences. In: Parasitology. 2006 ; Vol. 133, No. 5. pp. 631-638.
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Ponton, F, Lebarbenchon, C, Lefèvre, T, Thomas, F, Duneau, D, Marché, L, Renault, L, Hughes, DP & Biron, DG 2006, 'Hairworm anti-predator strategy: A study of causes and consequences', Parasitology, vol. 133, no. 5, pp. 631-638. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0031182006000904

Hairworm anti-predator strategy : A study of causes and consequences. / Ponton, F.; Lebarbenchon, C.; Lefèvre, T.; Thomas, F.; Duneau, D.; Marché, L.; Renault, L.; Hughes, David Peter; Biron, D. G.

In: Parasitology, Vol. 133, No. 5, 01.11.2006, p. 631-638.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Ponton F, Lebarbenchon C, Lefèvre T, Thomas F, Duneau D, Marché L et al. Hairworm anti-predator strategy: A study of causes and consequences. Parasitology. 2006 Nov 1;133(5):631-638. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0031182006000904