Handbook of decision making

Research output: Book/ReportBook

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Over time, thought processes and decision making styles evolved and were shaped by theological, philosophical, political, social, and environmental factors and trends. Recently, advances in technology have borne an unprecedented influence on our social environment. Contemporary thinking inevitably reflects this influence and moves us from a linear, cause -effect rationale to broader perspectives that encompass new methodologies and an understanding of networked and complex social relations. Handbook of Decision Making is the first text of its kind to include the mainstream methods and theories of decision making, describe the influence of theological and philosophical traditions, and offer contemporary scientific theories. Decision making styles and processes vary with context and no single theory is comprehensive enough to capture the complexity involved. The editor identifies common patterns and the variations that different contexts may generate. The text covers the mainstream methods of decision making such as cost-benefit analysis, linear programming, and queuing. It also explains alternative and emerging methods such as geographic information systems, Q-methodology, narrative policy analysis, methods of creative thinking, and conflict management. Practical applications of the methods discussed are illustrated by examples of decision making practices in budgeting, public administration, drug trafficking, and information systems. Handbook of Decision Making offers an understanding of decision making processes in a broader social context, which will enable decision makers to find the best methods for a given circumstances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Number of pages638
ISBN (Electronic)9781420016918
ISBN (Print)1574445480, 9781574445480
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

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