Hay baling as a business for former street children in Kenya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Destitute children are provided with food, shelter and education in government and non-profit centres in many African countries. Their successful re-entry into society remains a challenge due to difficulty finding gainful employment. We report on an initiative to assist youth at the Children and Youth Empowerment Centre in Nyeri to start their own businesses. A thriving suburban dairy sector in Kenya has led to strong demand for hay. Hay can be produced in the rural areas, baled, and transported to the towns. We introduced low-cost equipment to produce hay bales: Scythes to mow grass, and a push-through manual hay baler to make dense bales. Youth were trained in operating and maintaining scythes and construction of the manual hay baler. They formed a 4-person hay-baling team that made more than 500 bales for local farmers, being paid by the bale, enabling them to generate up to US$5 pp per day. Existence of an active hay market, skills training, a supporting organization, mentors, and project continuity over many years were identified as the key factors leading to success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalLivestock Research for Rural Development
Volume26
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 9 2014

Fingerprint

Kenya
hay
mentoring
rural areas
towns
education
dairies
farmers
grasses
markets

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

@article{e088add857dd4a95b8f8c939a8fd524c,
title = "Hay baling as a business for former street children in Kenya",
abstract = "Destitute children are provided with food, shelter and education in government and non-profit centres in many African countries. Their successful re-entry into society remains a challenge due to difficulty finding gainful employment. We report on an initiative to assist youth at the Children and Youth Empowerment Centre in Nyeri to start their own businesses. A thriving suburban dairy sector in Kenya has led to strong demand for hay. Hay can be produced in the rural areas, baled, and transported to the towns. We introduced low-cost equipment to produce hay bales: Scythes to mow grass, and a push-through manual hay baler to make dense bales. Youth were trained in operating and maintaining scythes and construction of the manual hay baler. They formed a 4-person hay-baling team that made more than 500 bales for local farmers, being paid by the bale, enabling them to generate up to US$5 pp per day. Existence of an active hay market, skills training, a supporting organization, mentors, and project continuity over many years were identified as the key factors leading to success.",
author = "Duiker, {Sjoerd Willem} and P. Maina",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
journal = "Livestock Research for Rural Development",
issn = "0121-3784",
publisher = "Centro para la Investigacion en Sistemas Sostenibles de Produccion Agropecuaria",
number = "1",

}

Hay baling as a business for former street children in Kenya. / Duiker, Sjoerd Willem; Maina, P.

In: Livestock Research for Rural Development, Vol. 26, No. 1, 09.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hay baling as a business for former street children in Kenya

AU - Duiker, Sjoerd Willem

AU - Maina, P.

PY - 2014/1/9

Y1 - 2014/1/9

N2 - Destitute children are provided with food, shelter and education in government and non-profit centres in many African countries. Their successful re-entry into society remains a challenge due to difficulty finding gainful employment. We report on an initiative to assist youth at the Children and Youth Empowerment Centre in Nyeri to start their own businesses. A thriving suburban dairy sector in Kenya has led to strong demand for hay. Hay can be produced in the rural areas, baled, and transported to the towns. We introduced low-cost equipment to produce hay bales: Scythes to mow grass, and a push-through manual hay baler to make dense bales. Youth were trained in operating and maintaining scythes and construction of the manual hay baler. They formed a 4-person hay-baling team that made more than 500 bales for local farmers, being paid by the bale, enabling them to generate up to US$5 pp per day. Existence of an active hay market, skills training, a supporting organization, mentors, and project continuity over many years were identified as the key factors leading to success.

AB - Destitute children are provided with food, shelter and education in government and non-profit centres in many African countries. Their successful re-entry into society remains a challenge due to difficulty finding gainful employment. We report on an initiative to assist youth at the Children and Youth Empowerment Centre in Nyeri to start their own businesses. A thriving suburban dairy sector in Kenya has led to strong demand for hay. Hay can be produced in the rural areas, baled, and transported to the towns. We introduced low-cost equipment to produce hay bales: Scythes to mow grass, and a push-through manual hay baler to make dense bales. Youth were trained in operating and maintaining scythes and construction of the manual hay baler. They formed a 4-person hay-baling team that made more than 500 bales for local farmers, being paid by the bale, enabling them to generate up to US$5 pp per day. Existence of an active hay market, skills training, a supporting organization, mentors, and project continuity over many years were identified as the key factors leading to success.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84891649425&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84891649425&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84891649425

VL - 26

JO - Livestock Research for Rural Development

JF - Livestock Research for Rural Development

SN - 0121-3784

IS - 1

ER -