Health care provider use of private sector internal error-reporting systems

Adam R. Roumm, Christopher Sciamanna, David B. Nash

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to review the state of the art of private sector internal error-reporting systems and to begin to develop a classification system for comparing systems. Interviews were conducted to research and examine 9 systems currently on the market. Analysis resulted in the following observations: (1) 7 of the systems are stand-alone, while 2 are part of larger hospital information systems; (2) most of the systems have been in existence for less than 5 years; (3) acute care hospitals are the primary clients; (4) systems are capable of interfacing with other information systems and root-cause analysis programs; and (5) systems are browser based and accessible via the Internet and/or the provider's intranet. Additional studies are needed to determine the impact of these systems on health outcomes. However, one fact is clear: tracking incidents will not improve patient safety unless administrators close the feedback loop on quality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)304-312
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Quality
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2005

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Root Cause Analysis
Hospital Information Systems
Computer Communication Networks
Private Sector
Patient Safety
Administrative Personnel
Information Systems
Health Personnel
Internet
Primary Health Care
Interviews
Health
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

Cite this

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Health care provider use of private sector internal error-reporting systems. / Roumm, Adam R.; Sciamanna, Christopher; Nash, David B.

In: American Journal of Medical Quality, Vol. 20, No. 6, 01.11.2005, p. 304-312.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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