Health Sciences Information Tools 2000: A cooperative health sciences library/public school information literacy program for medical assistant students

Lothar Spang, Ellen Marks, Nancy Adams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Educating diverse groups in how to access, use, and evaluate information available through information technologies is emerging as an essential responsibility for health sciences librarians in today's complex health care system. One group requiring immediate attention is medical assistants. Projections indicate that medical assistant careers will be among the fastest growing occupations in the twenty-first century. The expanding use and importance of information in all health care settings requires that this workforce be well versed in information literacy skills. But, for public school vocational education staff charged with educating entry level workers to meet this specialized demand, the expense of hiring qualified professionals and acquiring the sophisticated technology necessary to teach such skills poses a dilemma. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000, a cooperative workstudy information literacy program jointly formulated by the Wayne State University's Shiffman Medical Library and the Detroit Public Schools' Crockett Career and Technical Center, demonstrates that cooperation between the health sciences library and the public school is a mutually beneficial and constructive solution. This article describes the background, goals, curriculum, personnel, costs, and evaluation methods of Tools 2000. The Shiffman-Crockett information literacy program, adaptable to a variety of library settings, is an innovative means of preparing well-trained high school vocational education students for beginning level medical assistant positions as well as further education in the health care field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)534-540
Number of pages7
JournalBulletin of the Medical Library Association
Volume86
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 1 1998

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Library Schools
Information Literacy
Information Science
Medical Libraries
health science
Vocational Education
Medical Students
assistant
literacy
vocational education school
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Health
school
Librarians
Technology
health care
student
Midazolam
Occupations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Informatics

Cite this

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