Healthcare reform and the workplace experience of nurses: Implications for patient care and union organizing

Paul F. Clark, Darlene A. Clark, David V. Day, Dennis G. Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

The introduction of market-based reforms over the past twenty-five years has fundamentally changed the way healthcare is delivered in the United States. This paper reports the results of a survey of the workplace experiences and attitudes of hospital-based registered nurses under healthcare reform. The authors find that nurses who had experienced reform-related job restructuring held substantially more negative views of the climate for patient care than nurses who had not experienced restructuring. Also, nurses who had experienced reform-related mergers held more negative perceptions of the climate for patient care than those who had not been through a merger, although the relationship was less strong than it was for restructuring. Nurses concerned about a deteriorating climate for patient care indicated a desire for greater voice in the organization and staffing of hospitals and also indicated a greater readiness than other nurses to vote for a union.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-148
Number of pages16
JournalIndustrial and Labor Relations Review
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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