Heat recovery system control strategy to meet multiple transient demands

Horacio Perez-Blanco, Paul Albright

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    As increasing power generation needs are met with gas turbines, it is clear that exhaust heat recovery presents a considerable opportunity to reduce operational costs and enhance thermal efficiency. Typically, a system may provide power, process heat and cooling. However, each utility may have a daily demand curve with peaks that do not necessarily coincide in time. Hence, it is necessary to devise strategies that ensure meeting the needs of each user continually while maintaining high thermal efficiencies. To study these situations, a dynamic model of a system comprising a gas turbine, a heat recovery steam generator, and absorption machine was developed. The transient response of the system was studied to determine the effects of sudden changes in demand. Two control strategies utilizing proportional integral controls were considered. The first strategy relied on operating the turbine to meet the power required by the consumer. When power demands were low and steam and cooling demands high, a secondary control strategy operated the turbine to meet the steam demands, thus maximizing the thermal efficiency of the systemThe first strategy relied on operating the turbine to meet the power required by the consumer. When power demands were low and steam and cooling demands high, a secondary control strategy operated the turbine to meet the steam demands, thus maximizing the thermal efficiency of the system. System control and stability were tested, including simulation of a power distribution network simulating resistive, capacitance and inductive loads.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationHeat Transfer; Electric Power; Industrial and Cogeneration
    PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
    Volume3
    ISBN (Print)9780791878521
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
    EventASME Turbo Expo 2001: Power for Land, Sea, and Air, GT 2001 - New Orleans, LA, United States
    Duration: Jun 4 2001Jun 7 2001

    Other

    OtherASME Turbo Expo 2001: Power for Land, Sea, and Air, GT 2001
    CountryUnited States
    CityNew Orleans, LA
    Period6/4/016/7/01

    Fingerprint

    Waste heat utilization
    Control systems
    Turbines
    Steam
    Cooling
    Gas turbines
    Steam generators
    Electric power distribution
    Transient analysis
    Power generation
    Dynamic models
    Capacitance
    Hot Temperature
    Costs

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Engineering(all)

    Cite this

    Perez-Blanco, H., & Albright, P. (2001). Heat recovery system control strategy to meet multiple transient demands. In Heat Transfer; Electric Power; Industrial and Cogeneration (Vol. 3). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/2000-GT-0210
    Perez-Blanco, Horacio ; Albright, Paul. / Heat recovery system control strategy to meet multiple transient demands. Heat Transfer; Electric Power; Industrial and Cogeneration. Vol. 3 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2001.
    @inproceedings{223625db21904b948fe0b240922ac718,
    title = "Heat recovery system control strategy to meet multiple transient demands",
    abstract = "As increasing power generation needs are met with gas turbines, it is clear that exhaust heat recovery presents a considerable opportunity to reduce operational costs and enhance thermal efficiency. Typically, a system may provide power, process heat and cooling. However, each utility may have a daily demand curve with peaks that do not necessarily coincide in time. Hence, it is necessary to devise strategies that ensure meeting the needs of each user continually while maintaining high thermal efficiencies. To study these situations, a dynamic model of a system comprising a gas turbine, a heat recovery steam generator, and absorption machine was developed. The transient response of the system was studied to determine the effects of sudden changes in demand. Two control strategies utilizing proportional integral controls were considered. The first strategy relied on operating the turbine to meet the power required by the consumer. When power demands were low and steam and cooling demands high, a secondary control strategy operated the turbine to meet the steam demands, thus maximizing the thermal efficiency of the systemThe first strategy relied on operating the turbine to meet the power required by the consumer. When power demands were low and steam and cooling demands high, a secondary control strategy operated the turbine to meet the steam demands, thus maximizing the thermal efficiency of the system. System control and stability were tested, including simulation of a power distribution network simulating resistive, capacitance and inductive loads.",
    author = "Horacio Perez-Blanco and Paul Albright",
    year = "2001",
    month = "1",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1115/2000-GT-0210",
    language = "English (US)",
    isbn = "9780791878521",
    volume = "3",
    booktitle = "Heat Transfer; Electric Power; Industrial and Cogeneration",
    publisher = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)",

    }

    Perez-Blanco, H & Albright, P 2001, Heat recovery system control strategy to meet multiple transient demands. in Heat Transfer; Electric Power; Industrial and Cogeneration. vol. 3, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME Turbo Expo 2001: Power for Land, Sea, and Air, GT 2001, New Orleans, LA, United States, 6/4/01. https://doi.org/10.1115/2000-GT-0210

    Heat recovery system control strategy to meet multiple transient demands. / Perez-Blanco, Horacio; Albright, Paul.

    Heat Transfer; Electric Power; Industrial and Cogeneration. Vol. 3 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2001.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    TY - GEN

    T1 - Heat recovery system control strategy to meet multiple transient demands

    AU - Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    AU - Albright, Paul

    PY - 2001/1/1

    Y1 - 2001/1/1

    N2 - As increasing power generation needs are met with gas turbines, it is clear that exhaust heat recovery presents a considerable opportunity to reduce operational costs and enhance thermal efficiency. Typically, a system may provide power, process heat and cooling. However, each utility may have a daily demand curve with peaks that do not necessarily coincide in time. Hence, it is necessary to devise strategies that ensure meeting the needs of each user continually while maintaining high thermal efficiencies. To study these situations, a dynamic model of a system comprising a gas turbine, a heat recovery steam generator, and absorption machine was developed. The transient response of the system was studied to determine the effects of sudden changes in demand. Two control strategies utilizing proportional integral controls were considered. The first strategy relied on operating the turbine to meet the power required by the consumer. When power demands were low and steam and cooling demands high, a secondary control strategy operated the turbine to meet the steam demands, thus maximizing the thermal efficiency of the systemThe first strategy relied on operating the turbine to meet the power required by the consumer. When power demands were low and steam and cooling demands high, a secondary control strategy operated the turbine to meet the steam demands, thus maximizing the thermal efficiency of the system. System control and stability were tested, including simulation of a power distribution network simulating resistive, capacitance and inductive loads.

    AB - As increasing power generation needs are met with gas turbines, it is clear that exhaust heat recovery presents a considerable opportunity to reduce operational costs and enhance thermal efficiency. Typically, a system may provide power, process heat and cooling. However, each utility may have a daily demand curve with peaks that do not necessarily coincide in time. Hence, it is necessary to devise strategies that ensure meeting the needs of each user continually while maintaining high thermal efficiencies. To study these situations, a dynamic model of a system comprising a gas turbine, a heat recovery steam generator, and absorption machine was developed. The transient response of the system was studied to determine the effects of sudden changes in demand. Two control strategies utilizing proportional integral controls were considered. The first strategy relied on operating the turbine to meet the power required by the consumer. When power demands were low and steam and cooling demands high, a secondary control strategy operated the turbine to meet the steam demands, thus maximizing the thermal efficiency of the systemThe first strategy relied on operating the turbine to meet the power required by the consumer. When power demands were low and steam and cooling demands high, a secondary control strategy operated the turbine to meet the steam demands, thus maximizing the thermal efficiency of the system. System control and stability were tested, including simulation of a power distribution network simulating resistive, capacitance and inductive loads.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84905750454&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84905750454&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1115/2000-GT-0210

    DO - 10.1115/2000-GT-0210

    M3 - Conference contribution

    SN - 9780791878521

    VL - 3

    BT - Heat Transfer; Electric Power; Industrial and Cogeneration

    PB - American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)

    ER -

    Perez-Blanco H, Albright P. Heat recovery system control strategy to meet multiple transient demands. In Heat Transfer; Electric Power; Industrial and Cogeneration. Vol. 3. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2001 https://doi.org/10.1115/2000-GT-0210