Heligmosomoides polygyrus reduces infestation of Ixodes ricinus in free-living yellow-necked mice, Apodemus flavicollis

N. Ferrari, Isabella Cattadori, A. Rizzoli, Peter John Hudson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Free-living animals are usually inhabited by a community of parasitic species that can interact with each other and alter both host susceptibility and parasite transmission. In this study we tested the prediction that an increase in the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus would increase the infestation of the tick Ixodes ricinus, in free-living yellow-necked mice, Apodemus flavicollis. An extensive cross-sectional trapping survey identified a negative relationship between H. polygyrus and I. ricinus counter to the prediction. An experimental reduction of the nematode infection through anthelmintic treatment resulted in an increase in tick infestation, suggesting that this negative association was one of cause and effect. Host characteristics (breeding condition and age) and habitat variables also contributed to affect tick infestation. While these results were counter to the prediction, they still support the hypothesis that interactions between parasite species can shape parasite community dynamics in natural systems. Laboratory models may act differently from natural populations and the mechanism generating the negative association is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-316
Number of pages12
JournalParasitology
Volume136
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009

Fingerprint

Nematospiroides dubius
Tick Infestations
Heligmosomoides polygyrus
Apodemus flavicollis
Murinae
tick infestations
Ixodes
Ixodes ricinus
Parasites
parasites
prediction
mice
Nematode Infections
Anthelmintics
nematode infections
gastrointestinal nematodes
anthelmintics
Breeding
Ecosystem
trapping

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

@article{fc97bf6539b34c458927d9cb8dd8c3af,
title = "Heligmosomoides polygyrus reduces infestation of Ixodes ricinus in free-living yellow-necked mice, Apodemus flavicollis",
abstract = "Free-living animals are usually inhabited by a community of parasitic species that can interact with each other and alter both host susceptibility and parasite transmission. In this study we tested the prediction that an increase in the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus would increase the infestation of the tick Ixodes ricinus, in free-living yellow-necked mice, Apodemus flavicollis. An extensive cross-sectional trapping survey identified a negative relationship between H. polygyrus and I. ricinus counter to the prediction. An experimental reduction of the nematode infection through anthelmintic treatment resulted in an increase in tick infestation, suggesting that this negative association was one of cause and effect. Host characteristics (breeding condition and age) and habitat variables also contributed to affect tick infestation. While these results were counter to the prediction, they still support the hypothesis that interactions between parasite species can shape parasite community dynamics in natural systems. Laboratory models may act differently from natural populations and the mechanism generating the negative association is discussed.",
author = "N. Ferrari and Isabella Cattadori and A. Rizzoli and Hudson, {Peter John}",
year = "2009",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S0031182008005404",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "136",
pages = "305--316",
journal = "Parasitology",
issn = "0031-1820",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "3",

}

Heligmosomoides polygyrus reduces infestation of Ixodes ricinus in free-living yellow-necked mice, Apodemus flavicollis. / Ferrari, N.; Cattadori, Isabella; Rizzoli, A.; Hudson, Peter John.

In: Parasitology, Vol. 136, No. 3, 01.03.2009, p. 305-316.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heligmosomoides polygyrus reduces infestation of Ixodes ricinus in free-living yellow-necked mice, Apodemus flavicollis

AU - Ferrari, N.

AU - Cattadori, Isabella

AU - Rizzoli, A.

AU - Hudson, Peter John

PY - 2009/3/1

Y1 - 2009/3/1

N2 - Free-living animals are usually inhabited by a community of parasitic species that can interact with each other and alter both host susceptibility and parasite transmission. In this study we tested the prediction that an increase in the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus would increase the infestation of the tick Ixodes ricinus, in free-living yellow-necked mice, Apodemus flavicollis. An extensive cross-sectional trapping survey identified a negative relationship between H. polygyrus and I. ricinus counter to the prediction. An experimental reduction of the nematode infection through anthelmintic treatment resulted in an increase in tick infestation, suggesting that this negative association was one of cause and effect. Host characteristics (breeding condition and age) and habitat variables also contributed to affect tick infestation. While these results were counter to the prediction, they still support the hypothesis that interactions between parasite species can shape parasite community dynamics in natural systems. Laboratory models may act differently from natural populations and the mechanism generating the negative association is discussed.

AB - Free-living animals are usually inhabited by a community of parasitic species that can interact with each other and alter both host susceptibility and parasite transmission. In this study we tested the prediction that an increase in the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus would increase the infestation of the tick Ixodes ricinus, in free-living yellow-necked mice, Apodemus flavicollis. An extensive cross-sectional trapping survey identified a negative relationship between H. polygyrus and I. ricinus counter to the prediction. An experimental reduction of the nematode infection through anthelmintic treatment resulted in an increase in tick infestation, suggesting that this negative association was one of cause and effect. Host characteristics (breeding condition and age) and habitat variables also contributed to affect tick infestation. While these results were counter to the prediction, they still support the hypothesis that interactions between parasite species can shape parasite community dynamics in natural systems. Laboratory models may act differently from natural populations and the mechanism generating the negative association is discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=63449128599&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=63449128599&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0031182008005404

DO - 10.1017/S0031182008005404

M3 - Article

C2 - 19154651

AN - SCOPUS:63449128599

VL - 136

SP - 305

EP - 316

JO - Parasitology

JF - Parasitology

SN - 0031-1820

IS - 3

ER -