Heritability of early blight resistance in a Lycopersicon esculentum × Lycopersicon hirsutum cross estimated by correlation between parent and progeny

M. R. Foolad, G. Y. Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sixteen-hundred BC1 plants of a cross between an early blight (EB) susceptible tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) breeding line ('NC84173'; maternal and recurrent parent) and a resistant accession ('PI126445') of the tomato wild species Lycopersicon hirsutum Humb. and Bonpl. were grown in a field in 1998. This population was segregating (among other traits) for growth habit, self-incompatibility and earliness in maturity. To eliminate confounding effects of these factors on disease evaluation and h2 estimation, plants that were self-incompatible, indeterminate and/or late-maturing were eliminated. The remaining plants (146), which were self-compatible and determinate (sp./sp.) in growth habit, with early- to mid-season maturity, were evaluated for EB resistance and self-pollinated to produce BC1S1 seed. The 146 BC1S1 progeny families, consisting of 30 plants per family, were grown in a replicated field trial in 1999 and evaluated for EB resistance and plant maturity. For each of the 146 BC1 plants and corresponding BC1S1 families, the area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) and final disease severity (final percentage defoliation) were determined and used to measure disease resistance. The distributions of the AUDPC and final percentage defoliation values in the BC1 and BC1S1 generations indicated that resistance from 'PI126445' was quantitative in nature. Estimates of h2 for EB resistance, computed by correlation between BC1S1 progeny family means and BC1 individual plant values, ranged from 0.69 to 0.70, indicating that EB resistance of 'PI126445' was heritable. Across BC1S1 families, a small, but significant, negative correlation (r = -0.26, P < 0.01) was observed between disease resistance and earliness in maturity. However, several BC1S1 families were identified with considerable EB resistance and reasonably early maturity. These families should be useful for the development of commercially acceptable EB-resistant tomato lines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-177
Number of pages5
JournalPlant Breeding
Volume120
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 21 2001

Fingerprint

Solanum habrochaites
Lycopersicon esculentum
blight
Solanum lycopersicum var. lycopersicum
heritability
early development
Disease Resistance
growth habit
tomatoes
defoliation
Habits
disease resistance
Growth
breeding lines
disease severity
Breeding
Seeds
field experimentation
Mothers
seeds

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Genetics
  • Plant Science

Cite this

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title = "Heritability of early blight resistance in a Lycopersicon esculentum × Lycopersicon hirsutum cross estimated by correlation between parent and progeny",
abstract = "Sixteen-hundred BC1 plants of a cross between an early blight (EB) susceptible tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) breeding line ('NC84173'; maternal and recurrent parent) and a resistant accession ('PI126445') of the tomato wild species Lycopersicon hirsutum Humb. and Bonpl. were grown in a field in 1998. This population was segregating (among other traits) for growth habit, self-incompatibility and earliness in maturity. To eliminate confounding effects of these factors on disease evaluation and h2 estimation, plants that were self-incompatible, indeterminate and/or late-maturing were eliminated. The remaining plants (146), which were self-compatible and determinate (sp./sp.) in growth habit, with early- to mid-season maturity, were evaluated for EB resistance and self-pollinated to produce BC1S1 seed. The 146 BC1S1 progeny families, consisting of 30 plants per family, were grown in a replicated field trial in 1999 and evaluated for EB resistance and plant maturity. For each of the 146 BC1 plants and corresponding BC1S1 families, the area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) and final disease severity (final percentage defoliation) were determined and used to measure disease resistance. The distributions of the AUDPC and final percentage defoliation values in the BC1 and BC1S1 generations indicated that resistance from 'PI126445' was quantitative in nature. Estimates of h2 for EB resistance, computed by correlation between BC1S1 progeny family means and BC1 individual plant values, ranged from 0.69 to 0.70, indicating that EB resistance of 'PI126445' was heritable. Across BC1S1 families, a small, but significant, negative correlation (r = -0.26, P < 0.01) was observed between disease resistance and earliness in maturity. However, several BC1S1 families were identified with considerable EB resistance and reasonably early maturity. These families should be useful for the development of commercially acceptable EB-resistant tomato lines.",
author = "Foolad, {M. R.} and Lin, {G. Y.}",
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