Heritable and nonheritable pathways to early callous-unemotional behaviors

Luke W. Hyde, Rebecca Waller, Christopher J. Trentacosta, Daniel S. Shaw, Jenae M. Neiderhiser, Jody M. Ganiban, David Reiss, Leslie D. Leve

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Callous-unemotional behaviors in early childhood signal higher risk for trajectories of antisocial behavior and callous-unemotional traits that culminate in later diagnoses of conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and psychopathy. Studies demonstrate high heritability of callousunemotional traits, but little research has examined specific heritable pathways to early callous-unemotional behaviors. Studies also indicate that positive parenting protects against the development of callous-unemotional traits, but genetically informed designs have not been used to confirm that these relationships are not the product of gene-environment correlations. In a sample of adopted children and their biological and adoptive mothers, the authors tested novel heritable and nonheritable pathways to preschool callous-unemotional behaviors. Method: In an adoption cohort of 561 families, history of severe antisocial behavior assessed in biological mothers and observations of adoptive mother positive reinforcement at 18 months were examined as predictors of callousunemotional behaviors at 27 months. Results: Despitelimitedornocontactwithoffspring,biological mother antisocial behavior predicted early callous-unemotional behaviors. Adoptive mother positive reinforcement protected against early callous-unemotional behaviors. High levels of adoptive mother positive reinforcement buffered the effects of heritable risk for callous-unemotional behaviors posed by biological mother antisocial behavior. Conclusions: The findings elucidate heritable and nonheritable pathways to early callous-unemotional behaviors. The results provide a specific heritable pathway to callousunemotional behaviors and compelling evidence that parenting is an important nonheritable factor in the development of callous-unemotional behaviors. The finding that positive reinforcement buffered heritable risk for callous-unemotional behaviors has important translational implications for the prevention of trajectories to serious antisocial behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)903-910
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume173
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

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Mothers
Parenting
Antisocial Personality Disorder
Conduct Disorder
Delayed Diagnosis
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Research
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Hyde, L. W., Waller, R., Trentacosta, C. J., Shaw, D. S., Neiderhiser, J. M., Ganiban, J. M., ... Leve, L. D. (2016). Heritable and nonheritable pathways to early callous-unemotional behaviors. American Journal of Psychiatry, 173(9), 903-910. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.15111381
Hyde, Luke W. ; Waller, Rebecca ; Trentacosta, Christopher J. ; Shaw, Daniel S. ; Neiderhiser, Jenae M. ; Ganiban, Jody M. ; Reiss, David ; Leve, Leslie D. / Heritable and nonheritable pathways to early callous-unemotional behaviors. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 2016 ; Vol. 173, No. 9. pp. 903-910.
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Hyde, LW, Waller, R, Trentacosta, CJ, Shaw, DS, Neiderhiser, JM, Ganiban, JM, Reiss, D & Leve, LD 2016, 'Heritable and nonheritable pathways to early callous-unemotional behaviors', American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 173, no. 9, pp. 903-910. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.15111381

Heritable and nonheritable pathways to early callous-unemotional behaviors. / Hyde, Luke W.; Waller, Rebecca; Trentacosta, Christopher J.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Ganiban, Jody M.; Reiss, David; Leve, Leslie D.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 173, No. 9, 01.09.2016, p. 903-910.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Hyde, Luke W.

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N2 - Objective: Callous-unemotional behaviors in early childhood signal higher risk for trajectories of antisocial behavior and callous-unemotional traits that culminate in later diagnoses of conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and psychopathy. Studies demonstrate high heritability of callousunemotional traits, but little research has examined specific heritable pathways to early callous-unemotional behaviors. Studies also indicate that positive parenting protects against the development of callous-unemotional traits, but genetically informed designs have not been used to confirm that these relationships are not the product of gene-environment correlations. In a sample of adopted children and their biological and adoptive mothers, the authors tested novel heritable and nonheritable pathways to preschool callous-unemotional behaviors. Method: In an adoption cohort of 561 families, history of severe antisocial behavior assessed in biological mothers and observations of adoptive mother positive reinforcement at 18 months were examined as predictors of callousunemotional behaviors at 27 months. Results: Despitelimitedornocontactwithoffspring,biological mother antisocial behavior predicted early callous-unemotional behaviors. Adoptive mother positive reinforcement protected against early callous-unemotional behaviors. High levels of adoptive mother positive reinforcement buffered the effects of heritable risk for callous-unemotional behaviors posed by biological mother antisocial behavior. Conclusions: The findings elucidate heritable and nonheritable pathways to early callous-unemotional behaviors. The results provide a specific heritable pathway to callousunemotional behaviors and compelling evidence that parenting is an important nonheritable factor in the development of callous-unemotional behaviors. The finding that positive reinforcement buffered heritable risk for callous-unemotional behaviors has important translational implications for the prevention of trajectories to serious antisocial behavior.

AB - Objective: Callous-unemotional behaviors in early childhood signal higher risk for trajectories of antisocial behavior and callous-unemotional traits that culminate in later diagnoses of conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and psychopathy. Studies demonstrate high heritability of callousunemotional traits, but little research has examined specific heritable pathways to early callous-unemotional behaviors. Studies also indicate that positive parenting protects against the development of callous-unemotional traits, but genetically informed designs have not been used to confirm that these relationships are not the product of gene-environment correlations. In a sample of adopted children and their biological and adoptive mothers, the authors tested novel heritable and nonheritable pathways to preschool callous-unemotional behaviors. Method: In an adoption cohort of 561 families, history of severe antisocial behavior assessed in biological mothers and observations of adoptive mother positive reinforcement at 18 months were examined as predictors of callousunemotional behaviors at 27 months. Results: Despitelimitedornocontactwithoffspring,biological mother antisocial behavior predicted early callous-unemotional behaviors. Adoptive mother positive reinforcement protected against early callous-unemotional behaviors. High levels of adoptive mother positive reinforcement buffered the effects of heritable risk for callous-unemotional behaviors posed by biological mother antisocial behavior. Conclusions: The findings elucidate heritable and nonheritable pathways to early callous-unemotional behaviors. The results provide a specific heritable pathway to callousunemotional behaviors and compelling evidence that parenting is an important nonheritable factor in the development of callous-unemotional behaviors. The finding that positive reinforcement buffered heritable risk for callous-unemotional behaviors has important translational implications for the prevention of trajectories to serious antisocial behavior.

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