Herpes zoster infection and postherpetic neuralgia.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV), the cause of chicken pox, establishes latent infection in sensory ganglia. Reactivation results in zoster (shingles), sometimes complicated by encephalitis (myelitis). Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is the major morbidity of zoster. PHN typically increases in frequency with age. The VZV vaccine, which was developed for children, may be effective in enhancing VZV immune reactivity and decreasing zoster in adults. Early antiviral treatment may be effective in decreasing PHN onset. Several other medications may be useful in treating established PHN. A recent report discussed intrathecal steroid use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)526-532
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Neurology and Neuroscience Reports
Volume1
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

Postherpetic Neuralgia
Herpes Zoster
Human Herpesvirus 3
Infection
Herpes Zoster Vaccine
Sensory Ganglia
Myelitis
Chickenpox
Encephalitis
Antiviral Agents
Steroids
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

@article{c0c8bf43d3fd41c4b1aa149ce92f757e,
title = "Herpes zoster infection and postherpetic neuralgia.",
abstract = "Varicella-zoster virus (VZV), the cause of chicken pox, establishes latent infection in sensory ganglia. Reactivation results in zoster (shingles), sometimes complicated by encephalitis (myelitis). Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is the major morbidity of zoster. PHN typically increases in frequency with age. The VZV vaccine, which was developed for children, may be effective in enhancing VZV immune reactivity and decreasing zoster in adults. Early antiviral treatment may be effective in decreasing PHN onset. Several other medications may be useful in treating established PHN. A recent report discussed intrathecal steroid use.",
author = "Richard Tenser",
year = "2001",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11910-001-0057-z",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "1",
pages = "526--532",
journal = "Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports",
issn = "1528-4042",
publisher = "Current Medicine Group",
number = "6",

}

Herpes zoster infection and postherpetic neuralgia. / Tenser, Richard.

In: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports, Vol. 1, No. 6, 01.01.2001, p. 526-532.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Herpes zoster infection and postherpetic neuralgia.

AU - Tenser, Richard

PY - 2001/1/1

Y1 - 2001/1/1

N2 - Varicella-zoster virus (VZV), the cause of chicken pox, establishes latent infection in sensory ganglia. Reactivation results in zoster (shingles), sometimes complicated by encephalitis (myelitis). Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is the major morbidity of zoster. PHN typically increases in frequency with age. The VZV vaccine, which was developed for children, may be effective in enhancing VZV immune reactivity and decreasing zoster in adults. Early antiviral treatment may be effective in decreasing PHN onset. Several other medications may be useful in treating established PHN. A recent report discussed intrathecal steroid use.

AB - Varicella-zoster virus (VZV), the cause of chicken pox, establishes latent infection in sensory ganglia. Reactivation results in zoster (shingles), sometimes complicated by encephalitis (myelitis). Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is the major morbidity of zoster. PHN typically increases in frequency with age. The VZV vaccine, which was developed for children, may be effective in enhancing VZV immune reactivity and decreasing zoster in adults. Early antiviral treatment may be effective in decreasing PHN onset. Several other medications may be useful in treating established PHN. A recent report discussed intrathecal steroid use.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035525008&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035525008&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11910-001-0057-z

DO - 10.1007/s11910-001-0057-z

M3 - Review article

VL - 1

SP - 526

EP - 532

JO - Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports

JF - Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports

SN - 1528-4042

IS - 6

ER -