Heterogeneity in maltreated and non-maltreated preschool children's inhibitory control

The interplay between parenting quality and child temperament

Elizabeth Cipriano-Essel, Elizabeth A. Skowron, Cynthia Stifter, Douglas Michael Teti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the contribution of child temperament, parenting, and their interaction on inhibitory control development in a sample of maltreated and non-maltreated preschool children. One hundred and eighteen mother-child dyads were drawn from predominantly low-income, rural communities. Dyads participated in a laboratory session in which maternal warm autonomy support, warm guidance, and strict/hostile control were observationally coded during a joint teaching task. Independent assessments of children's inhibitory control were obtained, and observers rated children's temperament. After relevant covariates, including income, maternal education, and child age and IQ were controlled for, there were no differences between the maltreatment and non-maltreatment groups in either children's inhibitory control or mothers' behaviours in the laboratory session. Even after much of the variance in children's inhibitory control was accounted for from the covariates, children's temperamental negativity moderated the effects of warm autonomy support on inhibitory control in both maltreatment and non-maltreatment groups. Temperamentally negative children whose mothers displayed more warm autonomy support showed greater inhibitory control, at levels on par with low-negative children. Findings suggest that heterogeneity in children's self-regulation may be due in part to individual differences in sensitivity to caregiver support for children's independence, even among those exposed to maltreatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-522
Number of pages22
JournalInfant and Child Development
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

Fingerprint

Temperament
Parenting
Preschool Children
Mothers
Rural Population
Individuality
Caregivers
Teaching
Joints

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

@article{b58156f0d83640229f51b73599d6a99b,
title = "Heterogeneity in maltreated and non-maltreated preschool children's inhibitory control: The interplay between parenting quality and child temperament",
abstract = "This study examined the contribution of child temperament, parenting, and their interaction on inhibitory control development in a sample of maltreated and non-maltreated preschool children. One hundred and eighteen mother-child dyads were drawn from predominantly low-income, rural communities. Dyads participated in a laboratory session in which maternal warm autonomy support, warm guidance, and strict/hostile control were observationally coded during a joint teaching task. Independent assessments of children's inhibitory control were obtained, and observers rated children's temperament. After relevant covariates, including income, maternal education, and child age and IQ were controlled for, there were no differences between the maltreatment and non-maltreatment groups in either children's inhibitory control or mothers' behaviours in the laboratory session. Even after much of the variance in children's inhibitory control was accounted for from the covariates, children's temperamental negativity moderated the effects of warm autonomy support on inhibitory control in both maltreatment and non-maltreatment groups. Temperamentally negative children whose mothers displayed more warm autonomy support showed greater inhibitory control, at levels on par with low-negative children. Findings suggest that heterogeneity in children's self-regulation may be due in part to individual differences in sensitivity to caregiver support for children's independence, even among those exposed to maltreatment.",
author = "Elizabeth Cipriano-Essel and Skowron, {Elizabeth A.} and Cynthia Stifter and Teti, {Douglas Michael}",
year = "2013",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/icd.1801",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "501--522",
journal = "Infant and Child Development",
issn = "1522-7227",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "5",

}

Heterogeneity in maltreated and non-maltreated preschool children's inhibitory control : The interplay between parenting quality and child temperament. / Cipriano-Essel, Elizabeth; Skowron, Elizabeth A.; Stifter, Cynthia; Teti, Douglas Michael.

In: Infant and Child Development, Vol. 22, No. 5, 01.09.2013, p. 501-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heterogeneity in maltreated and non-maltreated preschool children's inhibitory control

T2 - The interplay between parenting quality and child temperament

AU - Cipriano-Essel, Elizabeth

AU - Skowron, Elizabeth A.

AU - Stifter, Cynthia

AU - Teti, Douglas Michael

PY - 2013/9/1

Y1 - 2013/9/1

N2 - This study examined the contribution of child temperament, parenting, and their interaction on inhibitory control development in a sample of maltreated and non-maltreated preschool children. One hundred and eighteen mother-child dyads were drawn from predominantly low-income, rural communities. Dyads participated in a laboratory session in which maternal warm autonomy support, warm guidance, and strict/hostile control were observationally coded during a joint teaching task. Independent assessments of children's inhibitory control were obtained, and observers rated children's temperament. After relevant covariates, including income, maternal education, and child age and IQ were controlled for, there were no differences between the maltreatment and non-maltreatment groups in either children's inhibitory control or mothers' behaviours in the laboratory session. Even after much of the variance in children's inhibitory control was accounted for from the covariates, children's temperamental negativity moderated the effects of warm autonomy support on inhibitory control in both maltreatment and non-maltreatment groups. Temperamentally negative children whose mothers displayed more warm autonomy support showed greater inhibitory control, at levels on par with low-negative children. Findings suggest that heterogeneity in children's self-regulation may be due in part to individual differences in sensitivity to caregiver support for children's independence, even among those exposed to maltreatment.

AB - This study examined the contribution of child temperament, parenting, and their interaction on inhibitory control development in a sample of maltreated and non-maltreated preschool children. One hundred and eighteen mother-child dyads were drawn from predominantly low-income, rural communities. Dyads participated in a laboratory session in which maternal warm autonomy support, warm guidance, and strict/hostile control were observationally coded during a joint teaching task. Independent assessments of children's inhibitory control were obtained, and observers rated children's temperament. After relevant covariates, including income, maternal education, and child age and IQ were controlled for, there were no differences between the maltreatment and non-maltreatment groups in either children's inhibitory control or mothers' behaviours in the laboratory session. Even after much of the variance in children's inhibitory control was accounted for from the covariates, children's temperamental negativity moderated the effects of warm autonomy support on inhibitory control in both maltreatment and non-maltreatment groups. Temperamentally negative children whose mothers displayed more warm autonomy support showed greater inhibitory control, at levels on par with low-negative children. Findings suggest that heterogeneity in children's self-regulation may be due in part to individual differences in sensitivity to caregiver support for children's independence, even among those exposed to maltreatment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84885863774&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84885863774&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/icd.1801

DO - 10.1002/icd.1801

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 501

EP - 522

JO - Infant and Child Development

JF - Infant and Child Development

SN - 1522-7227

IS - 5

ER -