Hiccups due to gastroesophageal reflux

Lt Lee R. Schreiber, Michael R. Bowen, Frank A. Mino, Timothy Craig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hiccups (singultus) are most often a transient phenomenon that resolves without medical therapy. Intractable hiccups can be an indication of a serious underlying disease process and should be investigated. To demonstrate the evaluation of intractable singultus, we describe a patient who had unsuccessful outpatient therapy for persistent hiccups and who was subsequently found to have gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Efforts to determine the cause of the hiccups were negative except for endoscopically proven GER. On follow-up visits, antisingultus medications were withdrawn without return of hiccups, and repeat endoscopy showed substantial healing of the esophagitis. We conclude that GER may be underestimated as a cause of hiccups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-219
Number of pages3
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume88
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

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Hiccup
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Esophagitis
Endoscopy
Outpatients
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Schreiber, L. L. R., Bowen, M. R., Mino, F. A., & Craig, T. (1995). Hiccups due to gastroesophageal reflux. Southern Medical Journal, 88(2), 217-219.
Schreiber, Lt Lee R. ; Bowen, Michael R. ; Mino, Frank A. ; Craig, Timothy. / Hiccups due to gastroesophageal reflux. In: Southern Medical Journal. 1995 ; Vol. 88, No. 2. pp. 217-219.
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Schreiber, LLR, Bowen, MR, Mino, FA & Craig, T 1995, 'Hiccups due to gastroesophageal reflux', Southern Medical Journal, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 217-219.

Hiccups due to gastroesophageal reflux. / Schreiber, Lt Lee R.; Bowen, Michael R.; Mino, Frank A.; Craig, Timothy.

In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 88, No. 2, 01.01.1995, p. 217-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Schreiber LLR, Bowen MR, Mino FA, Craig T. Hiccups due to gastroesophageal reflux. Southern Medical Journal. 1995 Jan 1;88(2):217-219.