High quality visual evidence on presentation slides may offset the negative effects of redundant text and phrase headings

Keri Lynn Wolfe, Michael P. Alley, Joanna K. Garner

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper compares students' learning from a presentation that relies on the topicsubtopic slide structure versus students' learning from a presentation that follows an assertionevidence slide structure. In our experiment, two audiences heard the same recorded presentation, but one audience (48 participants) viewed topic-subtopic slides and another (52 participants) viewed assertion-evidence slides. The presentation, which took about 10 minutes to view, presented background information about cancer and then explained the process of how magnetic resonance imaging can detect cancerous tumors. Students were tested immediately after the presentation and then again several days later. One conclusion drawn from this experiment is that although not statistically significant, a positive trend occurred for the assertion-evidence slides leading to better comprehension of complex concepts. However, in comparison with results from participants viewing topic-subtopic slides in an earlier experiment, the participants viewing the topic-subtopic slides in the experiment of this paper fared much better. Two possibilities explain this result. One possible reason that the comprehension and retention of complex concepts in the topic-subtopic approach of this experiment fared better is that these slides included much more animation of text and images than in the previous experiment. Another possible reason for the increased scores by the topic-subtopic participants has to do with the visual evidence used for the topic-subtopic slides. For all eight slides presenting the complex concept of how magnetic resonance imaging works, the visual evidence had the same design as in the assertion-evidence slides. While the size of that evidence was typically smaller, the auditorium in which the experiment occurred had a relatively larger projected image than exists in most rooms. If the visual evidence of the topic-subtopic slides significantly affected the results, then the design of visual evidence appears to play a larger role in the comprehension of complex concepts than previously assumed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication119th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition
PublisherAmerican Society for Engineering Education
ISBN (Print)9780878232413
StatePublished - 2012
Event119th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition - San Antonio, TX, United States
Duration: Jun 10 2012Jun 13 2012

Other

Other119th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition
CountryUnited States
CitySan Antonio, TX
Period6/10/126/13/12

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'High quality visual evidence on presentation slides may offset the negative effects of redundant text and phrase headings'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Wolfe, K. L., Alley, M. P., & Garner, J. K. (2012). High quality visual evidence on presentation slides may offset the negative effects of redundant text and phrase headings. In 119th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition American Society for Engineering Education.