High-resolution and analytical transmission electron microscopy of mineral disorder and reactions

David R. Veblen, Jillian F. Banfield, George D. Guthrie, Peter J. Heaney, Eugene S. Ilton, Kenneth J.T. Livi, Eugene A. Smelik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Crystal defects and chemical reactions occurring at scales beyond the resolution of light microscopes have major effects on the chemical and physical properties of rocks and minerals. High-resolution imaging, diffraction, and chemical analysis in the transmission electron microscope have become important methods for exploring mineral defect structures and reaction mechanisms and for studying the distribution of phases resulting from reactions. These techniques have shown that structural disorder is common in some rock-forming minerals but rare in others. They have also established mechanisms by which many reactions occur at the atomic cluster scale. These data thus provide an atomistic basis for understanding the kinetics of geological reactions. Furthermore, apparent major-element, minor-element, and trace-element chemistry of minerals can be influenced by submicroscopic inclusions or intergrowths, which commonly form as products of solid-state reactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1465-1472
Number of pages8
JournalScience
Volume260
Issue number5113
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Fingerprint

Transmission Electron Microscopy
Minerals
Trace Elements
Electrons
Light

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Veblen, D. R., Banfield, J. F., Guthrie, G. D., Heaney, P. J., Ilton, E. S., Livi, K. J. T., & Smelik, E. A. (1993). High-resolution and analytical transmission electron microscopy of mineral disorder and reactions. Science, 260(5113), 1465-1472. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.260.5113.1465
Veblen, David R. ; Banfield, Jillian F. ; Guthrie, George D. ; Heaney, Peter J. ; Ilton, Eugene S. ; Livi, Kenneth J.T. ; Smelik, Eugene A. / High-resolution and analytical transmission electron microscopy of mineral disorder and reactions. In: Science. 1993 ; Vol. 260, No. 5113. pp. 1465-1472.
@article{ef837fb76d674b5b97b88a4e85c2338b,
title = "High-resolution and analytical transmission electron microscopy of mineral disorder and reactions",
abstract = "Crystal defects and chemical reactions occurring at scales beyond the resolution of light microscopes have major effects on the chemical and physical properties of rocks and minerals. High-resolution imaging, diffraction, and chemical analysis in the transmission electron microscope have become important methods for exploring mineral defect structures and reaction mechanisms and for studying the distribution of phases resulting from reactions. These techniques have shown that structural disorder is common in some rock-forming minerals but rare in others. They have also established mechanisms by which many reactions occur at the atomic cluster scale. These data thus provide an atomistic basis for understanding the kinetics of geological reactions. Furthermore, apparent major-element, minor-element, and trace-element chemistry of minerals can be influenced by submicroscopic inclusions or intergrowths, which commonly form as products of solid-state reactions.",
author = "Veblen, {David R.} and Banfield, {Jillian F.} and Guthrie, {George D.} and Heaney, {Peter J.} and Ilton, {Eugene S.} and Livi, {Kenneth J.T.} and Smelik, {Eugene A.}",
year = "1993",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1126/science.260.5113.1465",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "260",
pages = "1465--1472",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "5113",

}

Veblen, DR, Banfield, JF, Guthrie, GD, Heaney, PJ, Ilton, ES, Livi, KJT & Smelik, EA 1993, 'High-resolution and analytical transmission electron microscopy of mineral disorder and reactions', Science, vol. 260, no. 5113, pp. 1465-1472. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.260.5113.1465

High-resolution and analytical transmission electron microscopy of mineral disorder and reactions. / Veblen, David R.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Guthrie, George D.; Heaney, Peter J.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Livi, Kenneth J.T.; Smelik, Eugene A.

In: Science, Vol. 260, No. 5113, 01.01.1993, p. 1465-1472.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - High-resolution and analytical transmission electron microscopy of mineral disorder and reactions

AU - Veblen, David R.

AU - Banfield, Jillian F.

AU - Guthrie, George D.

AU - Heaney, Peter J.

AU - Ilton, Eugene S.

AU - Livi, Kenneth J.T.

AU - Smelik, Eugene A.

PY - 1993/1/1

Y1 - 1993/1/1

N2 - Crystal defects and chemical reactions occurring at scales beyond the resolution of light microscopes have major effects on the chemical and physical properties of rocks and minerals. High-resolution imaging, diffraction, and chemical analysis in the transmission electron microscope have become important methods for exploring mineral defect structures and reaction mechanisms and for studying the distribution of phases resulting from reactions. These techniques have shown that structural disorder is common in some rock-forming minerals but rare in others. They have also established mechanisms by which many reactions occur at the atomic cluster scale. These data thus provide an atomistic basis for understanding the kinetics of geological reactions. Furthermore, apparent major-element, minor-element, and trace-element chemistry of minerals can be influenced by submicroscopic inclusions or intergrowths, which commonly form as products of solid-state reactions.

AB - Crystal defects and chemical reactions occurring at scales beyond the resolution of light microscopes have major effects on the chemical and physical properties of rocks and minerals. High-resolution imaging, diffraction, and chemical analysis in the transmission electron microscope have become important methods for exploring mineral defect structures and reaction mechanisms and for studying the distribution of phases resulting from reactions. These techniques have shown that structural disorder is common in some rock-forming minerals but rare in others. They have also established mechanisms by which many reactions occur at the atomic cluster scale. These data thus provide an atomistic basis for understanding the kinetics of geological reactions. Furthermore, apparent major-element, minor-element, and trace-element chemistry of minerals can be influenced by submicroscopic inclusions or intergrowths, which commonly form as products of solid-state reactions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0012250281&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0012250281&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/science.260.5113.1465

DO - 10.1126/science.260.5113.1465

M3 - Article

C2 - 17739802

AN - SCOPUS:0012250281

VL - 260

SP - 1465

EP - 1472

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 5113

ER -