High school soccer players with concussion education are more likely to notify their coach of a suspected concussion

Harry Bramley, Katherine Patrick, Erik Lehman, Matthew Silvis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previously published studies have found that concussion symptoms are underreported in youth athletics. This study evaluated the likelihood high school soccer players would identify themselves as having concussion related symptoms during game situations. A questionnaire inquiring about past concussion education and the likelihood of notifying their coach of concussion symptoms was administered to 183 high school soccer players. Of the 60 (33%) who completed the survey, 18 (72%) athletes who had acknowledged receiving concussion training responded that they would always notify their coach of concussion symptoms, as compared with 12 (36%) of the players who reported having no such training (P =.01). The results of this study suggest that athletes with past concussion training are more likely to notify their coach of concussion symptoms, potentially reducing their risk for further injury. Concussion education should be considered for all high school soccer players.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)332-336
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

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Soccer
Education
Athletes
Sports
Wounds and Injuries
Mentoring
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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High school soccer players with concussion education are more likely to notify their coach of a suspected concussion. / Bramley, Harry; Patrick, Katherine; Lehman, Erik; Silvis, Matthew.

In: Clinical Pediatrics, Vol. 51, No. 4, 01.04.2012, p. 332-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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