Abstract

Plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol has been associated both with risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and with age-related changes in cognitive function. This prospective study examined the relationship between baseline plasma LDL-cholesterol and cognitive changes in PD and matched Controls. Fasting plasma LDL-cholesterol levels were obtained at baseline from 64 non-demented PD subjects (62.7 ± 7.9 y) and 64 Controls (61.3 ± 6.8 y). Subjects underwent comprehensive neuropsychological testing at baseline, 18-, and 36-months. Linear mixed-effects modeling was used to assess the relationships between baseline LDL-cholesterol levels and longitudinal cognitive changes. At baseline, PD patients had lower scores of fine motor (p<0.0001), executive set shifting (p=0.018), and mental processing speed (p=0.049) compared to Controls. Longitudinally, Controls demonstrated improved fine motor and memory test scores (p=0.044, and p=0.003), whereas PD patients demonstrated significantly accelerated loss in fine motor skill (p=0.002) compared to Controls. Within the PD group, however, higher LDL-cholesterol levels were associated with improved executive set shifting (β=0.003, p<0.001) and fine motor scores (β=0.002, p=0.030) over time. These associations were absent in Controls (p>0.7). The cholesterol – executive set shifting association differed significantly between PDs and Controls (interaction p=0.005), whereas the cholesterol – fine motor association difference did not reach significance (interaction, p=0.104). In summary, higher plasma LDL-cholesterol levels were associated with better executive function and fine motor performance over time in PD, both of which may reflect an effect on nigrostriatal mediation. Confirmation of these results and elucidation of involved mechanisms are warranted, and might lead to feasible therapeutic strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-245
Number of pages9
JournalAging and Disease
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

LDL Cholesterol
Parkinson Disease
Cholesterol
Executive Function
Cognition
Fasting
Prospective Studies
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

@article{f4a6e73a53444394a163351faba6693c,
title = "Higher plasma LDL-cholesterol is associated with preserved executive and fine motor functions in Parkinson’s disease",
abstract = "Plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol has been associated both with risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and with age-related changes in cognitive function. This prospective study examined the relationship between baseline plasma LDL-cholesterol and cognitive changes in PD and matched Controls. Fasting plasma LDL-cholesterol levels were obtained at baseline from 64 non-demented PD subjects (62.7 ± 7.9 y) and 64 Controls (61.3 ± 6.8 y). Subjects underwent comprehensive neuropsychological testing at baseline, 18-, and 36-months. Linear mixed-effects modeling was used to assess the relationships between baseline LDL-cholesterol levels and longitudinal cognitive changes. At baseline, PD patients had lower scores of fine motor (p<0.0001), executive set shifting (p=0.018), and mental processing speed (p=0.049) compared to Controls. Longitudinally, Controls demonstrated improved fine motor and memory test scores (p=0.044, and p=0.003), whereas PD patients demonstrated significantly accelerated loss in fine motor skill (p=0.002) compared to Controls. Within the PD group, however, higher LDL-cholesterol levels were associated with improved executive set shifting (β=0.003, p<0.001) and fine motor scores (β=0.002, p=0.030) over time. These associations were absent in Controls (p>0.7). The cholesterol – executive set shifting association differed significantly between PDs and Controls (interaction p=0.005), whereas the cholesterol – fine motor association difference did not reach significance (interaction, p=0.104). In summary, higher plasma LDL-cholesterol levels were associated with better executive function and fine motor performance over time in PD, both of which may reflect an effect on nigrostriatal mediation. Confirmation of these results and elucidation of involved mechanisms are warranted, and might lead to feasible therapeutic strategies.",
author = "Sterling, {Nicholas W.} and Maya Lichtenstein and Lee, {Eun Young} and Mechelle Lewis and Alicia Evans and Paul Eslinger and Guangwei Du and Xiang Gao and Honglei Chen and Lan Kong and Xuemei Huang",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.14336/AD.2015.1030",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "237--245",
journal = "Aging and Disease",
issn = "2152-5250",
publisher = "International Society on Aging and Disease",
number = "3",

}

Higher plasma LDL-cholesterol is associated with preserved executive and fine motor functions in Parkinson’s disease. / Sterling, Nicholas W.; Lichtenstein, Maya; Lee, Eun Young; Lewis, Mechelle; Evans, Alicia; Eslinger, Paul; Du, Guangwei; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Honglei; Kong, Lan; Huang, Xuemei.

In: Aging and Disease, Vol. 7, No. 3, 01.01.2016, p. 237-245.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Higher plasma LDL-cholesterol is associated with preserved executive and fine motor functions in Parkinson’s disease

AU - Sterling, Nicholas W.

AU - Lichtenstein, Maya

AU - Lee, Eun Young

AU - Lewis, Mechelle

AU - Evans, Alicia

AU - Eslinger, Paul

AU - Du, Guangwei

AU - Gao, Xiang

AU - Chen, Honglei

AU - Kong, Lan

AU - Huang, Xuemei

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol has been associated both with risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and with age-related changes in cognitive function. This prospective study examined the relationship between baseline plasma LDL-cholesterol and cognitive changes in PD and matched Controls. Fasting plasma LDL-cholesterol levels were obtained at baseline from 64 non-demented PD subjects (62.7 ± 7.9 y) and 64 Controls (61.3 ± 6.8 y). Subjects underwent comprehensive neuropsychological testing at baseline, 18-, and 36-months. Linear mixed-effects modeling was used to assess the relationships between baseline LDL-cholesterol levels and longitudinal cognitive changes. At baseline, PD patients had lower scores of fine motor (p<0.0001), executive set shifting (p=0.018), and mental processing speed (p=0.049) compared to Controls. Longitudinally, Controls demonstrated improved fine motor and memory test scores (p=0.044, and p=0.003), whereas PD patients demonstrated significantly accelerated loss in fine motor skill (p=0.002) compared to Controls. Within the PD group, however, higher LDL-cholesterol levels were associated with improved executive set shifting (β=0.003, p<0.001) and fine motor scores (β=0.002, p=0.030) over time. These associations were absent in Controls (p>0.7). The cholesterol – executive set shifting association differed significantly between PDs and Controls (interaction p=0.005), whereas the cholesterol – fine motor association difference did not reach significance (interaction, p=0.104). In summary, higher plasma LDL-cholesterol levels were associated with better executive function and fine motor performance over time in PD, both of which may reflect an effect on nigrostriatal mediation. Confirmation of these results and elucidation of involved mechanisms are warranted, and might lead to feasible therapeutic strategies.

AB - Plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol has been associated both with risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and with age-related changes in cognitive function. This prospective study examined the relationship between baseline plasma LDL-cholesterol and cognitive changes in PD and matched Controls. Fasting plasma LDL-cholesterol levels were obtained at baseline from 64 non-demented PD subjects (62.7 ± 7.9 y) and 64 Controls (61.3 ± 6.8 y). Subjects underwent comprehensive neuropsychological testing at baseline, 18-, and 36-months. Linear mixed-effects modeling was used to assess the relationships between baseline LDL-cholesterol levels and longitudinal cognitive changes. At baseline, PD patients had lower scores of fine motor (p<0.0001), executive set shifting (p=0.018), and mental processing speed (p=0.049) compared to Controls. Longitudinally, Controls demonstrated improved fine motor and memory test scores (p=0.044, and p=0.003), whereas PD patients demonstrated significantly accelerated loss in fine motor skill (p=0.002) compared to Controls. Within the PD group, however, higher LDL-cholesterol levels were associated with improved executive set shifting (β=0.003, p<0.001) and fine motor scores (β=0.002, p=0.030) over time. These associations were absent in Controls (p>0.7). The cholesterol – executive set shifting association differed significantly between PDs and Controls (interaction p=0.005), whereas the cholesterol – fine motor association difference did not reach significance (interaction, p=0.104). In summary, higher plasma LDL-cholesterol levels were associated with better executive function and fine motor performance over time in PD, both of which may reflect an effect on nigrostriatal mediation. Confirmation of these results and elucidation of involved mechanisms are warranted, and might lead to feasible therapeutic strategies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030115192&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85030115192&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.14336/AD.2015.1030

DO - 10.14336/AD.2015.1030

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85030115192

VL - 7

SP - 237

EP - 245

JO - Aging and Disease

JF - Aging and Disease

SN - 2152-5250

IS - 3

ER -