Highly compressible origami bellows for microgravity drilling-debris containment

Jared Butler, Spencer Magleby, Larry Howell, Stefano Mancini, Aaron Parness

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The design and testing of an origami-based bellows for microgravity drilling is described. The potential benefits of an origami-based solution created an opportunity for application on NASA’s Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) to protect sensitive parts from debris. Origami-based bellows were designed to fit spatial limitations and meet needed compression ratios. Designs have demonstrated high mass reductions, improved stroke length, greatly decreased stowed volume, improved flexibility, and reduced reaction forces in comparison with traditional metal bellows. A nylon-reinforced polyvinyl fluoride based bellows with an aramid fiber stitched seam is well suited for debris containment in space conditions. Various epoxies maintained an adequate bond with polyvinyl fluoride below expected environmental temperature for bellows mounting. Asymmetric compression of the bellows occurs at extreme low temperatures and is preventable by balancing stiffness within the structure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAIAA SPACE and Astronautics Forum and Exposition
PublisherAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA
Edition203999
ISBN (Print)9781624104831
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017
EventAIAA Space and Astronautics Forum and Exposition, SPACE 2017 - Orlando, United States
Duration: Sep 12 2017Sep 14 2017

Publication series

NameAIAA SPACE and Astronautics Forum and Exposition, SPACE 2017
Number203999

Conference

ConferenceAIAA Space and Astronautics Forum and Exposition, SPACE 2017
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityOrlando
Period9/12/179/14/17

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aerospace Engineering

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