Hispanic Concentrated Poverty in Traditional and New Destinations, 2010–2014

Sarah M. Ludwig-Dehm, John David Iceland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines patterns of Hispanic concentrated poverty in traditional, new, and minor destinations. Using data from 2010 to 2014 from the American Community Survey, we find that without controlling for group characteristics, Hispanics experience a lower level of concentrated poverty in new destinations compared to traditional gateways. Metropolitan level factors explain this difference, including ethnic residential segregation, the Hispanic poverty rate, and the percentage of Hispanics who are foreign born. Overall, this study sheds new light on the Hispanic geographic dispersal in the United States and offers support for the argument that the Hispanic settlement into new destinations is associated with lower levels of concentrated poverty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)833-850
Number of pages18
JournalPopulation Research and Policy Review
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

poverty
segregation
community
experience
Group

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

@article{a655a3fa4dd3467cbfa244b440ac20b6,
title = "Hispanic Concentrated Poverty in Traditional and New Destinations, 2010–2014",
abstract = "This paper examines patterns of Hispanic concentrated poverty in traditional, new, and minor destinations. Using data from 2010 to 2014 from the American Community Survey, we find that without controlling for group characteristics, Hispanics experience a lower level of concentrated poverty in new destinations compared to traditional gateways. Metropolitan level factors explain this difference, including ethnic residential segregation, the Hispanic poverty rate, and the percentage of Hispanics who are foreign born. Overall, this study sheds new light on the Hispanic geographic dispersal in the United States and offers support for the argument that the Hispanic settlement into new destinations is associated with lower levels of concentrated poverty.",
author = "Ludwig-Dehm, {Sarah M.} and Iceland, {John David}",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11113-017-9446-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "833--850",
journal = "Population Research and Policy Review",
issn = "0167-5923",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "6",

}

Hispanic Concentrated Poverty in Traditional and New Destinations, 2010–2014. / Ludwig-Dehm, Sarah M.; Iceland, John David.

In: Population Research and Policy Review, Vol. 36, No. 6, 01.12.2017, p. 833-850.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hispanic Concentrated Poverty in Traditional and New Destinations, 2010–2014

AU - Ludwig-Dehm, Sarah M.

AU - Iceland, John David

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - This paper examines patterns of Hispanic concentrated poverty in traditional, new, and minor destinations. Using data from 2010 to 2014 from the American Community Survey, we find that without controlling for group characteristics, Hispanics experience a lower level of concentrated poverty in new destinations compared to traditional gateways. Metropolitan level factors explain this difference, including ethnic residential segregation, the Hispanic poverty rate, and the percentage of Hispanics who are foreign born. Overall, this study sheds new light on the Hispanic geographic dispersal in the United States and offers support for the argument that the Hispanic settlement into new destinations is associated with lower levels of concentrated poverty.

AB - This paper examines patterns of Hispanic concentrated poverty in traditional, new, and minor destinations. Using data from 2010 to 2014 from the American Community Survey, we find that without controlling for group characteristics, Hispanics experience a lower level of concentrated poverty in new destinations compared to traditional gateways. Metropolitan level factors explain this difference, including ethnic residential segregation, the Hispanic poverty rate, and the percentage of Hispanics who are foreign born. Overall, this study sheds new light on the Hispanic geographic dispersal in the United States and offers support for the argument that the Hispanic settlement into new destinations is associated with lower levels of concentrated poverty.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85029698320&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85029698320&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11113-017-9446-0

DO - 10.1007/s11113-017-9446-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 29599569

AN - SCOPUS:85029698320

VL - 36

SP - 833

EP - 850

JO - Population Research and Policy Review

JF - Population Research and Policy Review

SN - 0167-5923

IS - 6

ER -