Home Literacy Experiences Of Preschoolers Who Use Aac Systems And Of Their Nondisabled Peers

Janice Light, Alison Kelford Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

112 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A survey was employed to compare the home literacy experiences of physically disabled preschoolers who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems to the experiences of their nondisabled (ND) peers. Questionnaires were completed by 15 parents of children in each group. Results of the survey indicated that the general reading and writing environments in the households of the two groups were similar: there were available a range of literacy materials and regular models of others reading and writing. Although both groups of children were reported to be interested in literacy activities, the children in the AAC group had less opportunity to use printed materials or to participate in writing/drawing activities. When engaged in story reading activities, the children in the AAC group seemed to be less involved in initiating and asking questions about the text than the children in the ND group. Parental priorities for their children differed somewhat between the two groups. The parents in the AAC group gave highest priority to communication and then to physical needs such as mobility and feeding. The parents of the ND group gave highest priority to communication and making friends, and then to literacy activities. Results of the study are discussed in light of the literature, and directions for future research are suggested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10-25
Number of pages16
JournalAugmentative and Alternative Communication
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Communication
Reading
Parents
Communication Aids for Disabled
Disabled Persons
Literacy
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

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Home Literacy Experiences Of Preschoolers Who Use Aac Systems And Of Their Nondisabled Peers. / Light, Janice; Smith, Alison Kelford.

In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.01.1993, p. 10-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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