Homing in juvenile salmon in response to imposed and spontaneous displacement: Experiments in an artificial stream

F. A. Huntingford, V. A. Braithwaite, J. D. Armstrong, D. Aird, P. Joiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Displacement of juvenile Atlantic salmon Salmo salar within an artificial stream was either spontaneous (fish left areas of shallow water in response to experimental reduction in water level) or imposed (fish were removed by the experimenter from areas of shallow water and placed at a distance from their home site). Prior to displacement, the fish showed a high degree of site fidelity in terms of preferential use of specific areas within the stream, but the extent to which this persisted once they had left/been removed from their preferred sites was variable. Direction of displacement was not a critical factor, but homing was significantly less likely to occur following spontaneous as opposed to imposed displacement. In the case of imposed displacement, fish that were more strongly site attached prior to displacement were more likely to return to their home site after this manipulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)847-852
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Fish Biology
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1998

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science

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