Hop, skip... no! Explaining adolescent girls' disinclination for physical activity.

Kirsten Krahnstoever Davison, Dorothy L. Schmalz, Danielle Symons Downs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: This study aimed to develop and validate the Girls' Disinclination for Physical Activity Scale (G-DAS)and implement the scale along with an objective measure of physical activity (PA) in a longitudinal sample of adolescent girls. METHODS: Participants were non-Hispanic White girls who were assessed at ages 13 years (n=151) and 15 years (n=98). Girls completed the G-DAS and the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale and wore an accelerometer for 7 days. RESULTS: Results supported a five-factor solution for the GDAS;factors represented reasons for disliking PA including low perceived competence, lack of opportunities, high perceived exertion, concern about physical appearance,and threats to girls' gender identity. Data supported the reliability and validity of the G-DAS. Low perceived competence was the most common reason girls reported disliking PA and predicted a decreased likelihood of maintaining sufficient PA across ages 13 to 15 years.CONCLUSION: Developing PA-related skills prior to adolescence may reduce declines in adolescent girls' PA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)290-302
Number of pages13
JournalAnnals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Hop, skip... no! Explaining adolescent girls' disinclination for physical activity. / Davison, Kirsten Krahnstoever; Schmalz, Dorothy L.; Downs, Danielle Symons.

In: Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 39, No. 3, 01.06.2010, p. 290-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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