Horizontal and vertical structure of the major sporadic sodium layer events observed during ALOHA‐90

Timothy Joseph Kane, Chris A. Hostetler, Chester S. Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sporadic Na (Nas) layers have been observed frequently at low‐ and high‐altitude sites primarily in the Northern Hemisphere. Nas layers are very dense and very thin (∼1 km FWHM) and can form over periods ranging from a few minutes to several hours. Radar and lidar observations by our group at Arecibo have shown conclusively that Nas layers are linked to the formation of sporadic E (Es) layers. Large Nas events were observed on several flights during ALOHA‐90 to extend over horizontal distances of approximately 1800 km. Atmospheric tides and gravity waves were observed to have an effect on the vertical motion of these layers. We describe the 22 March event which was observed from Maui (21°N) to near the equator (5°N) and the 27 March event which was observed from Maui (156°W) to almost the International Date Line (∼172°W).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1365-1368
Number of pages4
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume18
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

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sodium
atmospheric tides
sporadic E layer
vertical motion
radar tracking
atmospheric tide
Northern Hemisphere
equators
gravity waves
optical radar
lidar
gravity wave
flight
radar

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Sporadic Na (Nas) layers have been observed frequently at low‐ and high‐altitude sites primarily in the Northern Hemisphere. Nas layers are very dense and very thin (∼1 km FWHM) and can form over periods ranging from a few minutes to several hours. Radar and lidar observations by our group at Arecibo have shown conclusively that Nas layers are linked to the formation of sporadic E (Es) layers. Large Nas events were observed on several flights during ALOHA‐90 to extend over horizontal distances of approximately 1800 km. Atmospheric tides and gravity waves were observed to have an effect on the vertical motion of these layers. We describe the 22 March event which was observed from Maui (21°N) to near the equator (5°N) and the 27 March event which was observed from Maui (156°W) to almost the International Date Line (∼172°W).",
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Horizontal and vertical structure of the major sporadic sodium layer events observed during ALOHA‐90. / Kane, Timothy Joseph; Hostetler, Chris A.; Gardner, Chester S.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 18, No. 7, 01.01.1991, p. 1365-1368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Gardner, Chester S.

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