Hormone Receptors and Breast Cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hormone dependency of human breast cancer has been known since 1896, when Beatson1 reported regression of inoperable primary tumors after ovariectomy in two premenopausal women. It is now well established that approximately one third of human breast carcinomas are responsive to hormones and will regress after a variety of hormonal manipulations. Until recently, there was no biochemical test that could reliably identify women who were harboring endocrine-dependent neoplasms and were thus likely to benefit from hormonal therapy. In 1971 Jensen et al.2 first reported that measurement of estrogen receptors in a tumor-biopsy specimen was useful in predicting the response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1383-1385
Number of pages3
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume309
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1983

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Hormones
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Ovariectomy
Estrogen Receptors
Biopsy
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "The hormone dependency of human breast cancer has been known since 1896, when Beatson1 reported regression of inoperable primary tumors after ovariectomy in two premenopausal women. It is now well established that approximately one third of human breast carcinomas are responsive to hormones and will regress after a variety of hormonal manipulations. Until recently, there was no biochemical test that could reliably identify women who were harboring endocrine-dependent neoplasms and were thus likely to benefit from hormonal therapy. In 1971 Jensen et al.2 first reported that measurement of estrogen receptors in a tumor-biopsy specimen was useful in predicting the response.",
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Hormone Receptors and Breast Cancer. / Manni, Andrea.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 309, No. 22, 01.12.1983, p. 1383-1385.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

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