Hourly plug load measurements and profiles for a medium office building - A case study

Payam Delgoshaei, Ke Xu, Walter Scott Wagner, Richard Sweetser, James Freihaut

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine the end use energy utilization profiles of major building subsystems - heating, ventilation, cooling, lighting, plug loads and/or servers - and accurately target potential energy efficiency improvement measures as well as establishing a building's performance relative to peer facilities, it is necessary to establish dynamic plug load energy use associated with occupant activity. As building façade, HVAC, and lighting component technologies improve and optimally employed in the context of the integrated design of a building, plug load related energy use becomes a more dominant component of the overall building energy utilization index. To clearly identify potential building subsystem energy efficiency improvements and develop strategies for ameliorating increases in plug load energy use via dynamic control and occupant awareness and involvement, rapid plug load measurement and assessment techniques are necessary. The current lack of measured plug load data that could be used as input for energy modelling has represented a significant gap in associating energy models with real building energy consumption. In this investigation, the circuits of multiple distribution panels were monitored to create hourly energy use plug load profiles associated with different end users within a tenant space of a medium-sized office building. The main use within the monitored space was associated with specialty conference rooms (ICON Lab and Telepresence Room), servers, workstations, copier/printer, kitchen amenities, and vacuum cleaning. Furthermore, the energy use data was further characterized according to day type (weekday and weekend). As a result of this work, hourly plug load profiles were generated based on actual measured data which will be used as input to energy models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAEI 2013
Subtitle of host publicationBuilding Solutions for Architectural Engineering - Proceedings of the 2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference
Pages827-836
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2013
Event2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering, AEI 2013 - State College, PA, United States
Duration: Apr 3 2013Apr 5 2013

Publication series

NameAEI 2013: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering - Proceedings of the 2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference

Other

Other2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering, AEI 2013
CountryUnited States
CityState College, PA
Period4/3/134/5/13

Fingerprint

Office buildings
Loads (forces)
Energy utilization
Dynamic loads
Energy efficiency
Servers
Lighting
Printers (computer)
Kitchens
Computer workstations
Potential energy
Ventilation
Cleaning
Vacuum
Cooling
Heating
Networks (circuits)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Architecture

Cite this

Delgoshaei, P., Xu, K., Wagner, W. S., Sweetser, R., & Freihaut, J. (2013). Hourly plug load measurements and profiles for a medium office building - A case study. In AEI 2013: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering - Proceedings of the 2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference (pp. 827-836). (AEI 2013: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering - Proceedings of the 2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784412909.081
Delgoshaei, Payam ; Xu, Ke ; Wagner, Walter Scott ; Sweetser, Richard ; Freihaut, James. / Hourly plug load measurements and profiles for a medium office building - A case study. AEI 2013: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering - Proceedings of the 2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference. 2013. pp. 827-836 (AEI 2013: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering - Proceedings of the 2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference).
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Delgoshaei, P, Xu, K, Wagner, WS, Sweetser, R & Freihaut, J 2013, Hourly plug load measurements and profiles for a medium office building - A case study. in AEI 2013: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering - Proceedings of the 2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference. AEI 2013: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering - Proceedings of the 2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference, pp. 827-836, 2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering, AEI 2013, State College, PA, United States, 4/3/13. https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784412909.081

Hourly plug load measurements and profiles for a medium office building - A case study. / Delgoshaei, Payam; Xu, Ke; Wagner, Walter Scott; Sweetser, Richard; Freihaut, James.

AEI 2013: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering - Proceedings of the 2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference. 2013. p. 827-836 (AEI 2013: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering - Proceedings of the 2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Delgoshaei P, Xu K, Wagner WS, Sweetser R, Freihaut J. Hourly plug load measurements and profiles for a medium office building - A case study. In AEI 2013: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering - Proceedings of the 2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference. 2013. p. 827-836. (AEI 2013: Building Solutions for Architectural Engineering - Proceedings of the 2013 Architectural Engineering National Conference). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784412909.081