Housework time from middle childhood through adolescence: Links to parental work hours and youth adjustment

Chun Bun Lam, Kaylin M. Greene, Susan M. McHale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The developmental course, family correlates, and adjustment implications of youth housework participation from age 8-18 were examined. Mothers, fathers, and 2 siblings from 201 European American families provided questionnaire and/or daily diary data on 6 occasions across 7 years. Multilevel modeling within an accelerated longitudinal design revealed that girls spent more time on housework than did boys, but that housework time of both girls and boys increased from middle childhood to mid-adolescence and leveled off thereafter. In years when mothers were employed for more hours than usual, girls, but not boys, spent more time on housework than usual. Housework time was linked to more depressive symptoms (at a between-person level) and predicted lower school grades (at a within-person level) for youth with low familism values. Housework time also predicted more depressive symptoms (at a within-person level) for youth with high parent-youth conflict about housework. Findings highlight the gendered nature of housework allocation and the importance of considering both individual and contextual factors when examining youth daily activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2071-2084
Number of pages14
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume52
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

Social Adjustment
Housekeeping
housework
adolescence
childhood
human being
Mothers
Depression
time
Fathers
Siblings
father
parents
school grade
participation
questionnaire

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

@article{3caa6027cf1a491581db1ad87a613e50,
title = "Housework time from middle childhood through adolescence: Links to parental work hours and youth adjustment",
abstract = "The developmental course, family correlates, and adjustment implications of youth housework participation from age 8-18 were examined. Mothers, fathers, and 2 siblings from 201 European American families provided questionnaire and/or daily diary data on 6 occasions across 7 years. Multilevel modeling within an accelerated longitudinal design revealed that girls spent more time on housework than did boys, but that housework time of both girls and boys increased from middle childhood to mid-adolescence and leveled off thereafter. In years when mothers were employed for more hours than usual, girls, but not boys, spent more time on housework than usual. Housework time was linked to more depressive symptoms (at a between-person level) and predicted lower school grades (at a within-person level) for youth with low familism values. Housework time also predicted more depressive symptoms (at a within-person level) for youth with high parent-youth conflict about housework. Findings highlight the gendered nature of housework allocation and the importance of considering both individual and contextual factors when examining youth daily activities.",
author = "Lam, {Chun Bun} and Greene, {Kaylin M.} and McHale, {Susan M.}",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/dev0000223",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "52",
pages = "2071--2084",
journal = "Developmental Psychology",
issn = "0012-1649",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "12",

}

Housework time from middle childhood through adolescence : Links to parental work hours and youth adjustment. / Lam, Chun Bun; Greene, Kaylin M.; McHale, Susan M.

In: Developmental psychology, Vol. 52, No. 12, 01.12.2016, p. 2071-2084.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Housework time from middle childhood through adolescence

T2 - Links to parental work hours and youth adjustment

AU - Lam, Chun Bun

AU - Greene, Kaylin M.

AU - McHale, Susan M.

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - The developmental course, family correlates, and adjustment implications of youth housework participation from age 8-18 were examined. Mothers, fathers, and 2 siblings from 201 European American families provided questionnaire and/or daily diary data on 6 occasions across 7 years. Multilevel modeling within an accelerated longitudinal design revealed that girls spent more time on housework than did boys, but that housework time of both girls and boys increased from middle childhood to mid-adolescence and leveled off thereafter. In years when mothers were employed for more hours than usual, girls, but not boys, spent more time on housework than usual. Housework time was linked to more depressive symptoms (at a between-person level) and predicted lower school grades (at a within-person level) for youth with low familism values. Housework time also predicted more depressive symptoms (at a within-person level) for youth with high parent-youth conflict about housework. Findings highlight the gendered nature of housework allocation and the importance of considering both individual and contextual factors when examining youth daily activities.

AB - The developmental course, family correlates, and adjustment implications of youth housework participation from age 8-18 were examined. Mothers, fathers, and 2 siblings from 201 European American families provided questionnaire and/or daily diary data on 6 occasions across 7 years. Multilevel modeling within an accelerated longitudinal design revealed that girls spent more time on housework than did boys, but that housework time of both girls and boys increased from middle childhood to mid-adolescence and leveled off thereafter. In years when mothers were employed for more hours than usual, girls, but not boys, spent more time on housework than usual. Housework time was linked to more depressive symptoms (at a between-person level) and predicted lower school grades (at a within-person level) for youth with low familism values. Housework time also predicted more depressive symptoms (at a within-person level) for youth with high parent-youth conflict about housework. Findings highlight the gendered nature of housework allocation and the importance of considering both individual and contextual factors when examining youth daily activities.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84991078945&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84991078945&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/dev0000223

DO - 10.1037/dev0000223

M3 - Article

C2 - 27736102

AN - SCOPUS:84991078945

VL - 52

SP - 2071

EP - 2084

JO - Developmental Psychology

JF - Developmental Psychology

SN - 0012-1649

IS - 12

ER -