How a creative storytelling intervention can improve medical student attitude towards persons with dementia: A mixed methods study

Daniel George, Heather Stuckey, Megan M. Whitehead

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The creative arts can integrate humanistic experiences into geriatric education. This experiential learning case study evaluated whether medical student participation in TimeSlips, a creative storytelling program with persons affected by dementia, would improve attitudes towards this patient population. Methods: Twenty-two fourth-year medical students participated in TimeSlips for one month. The authors analyzed pre- and post-program scores of items, sub-domains for comfort and knowledge, and overall scale from the Dementia Attitudes Scale using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon Signed-rank tests to evaluate mean change in students' self-reported attitudes towards persons with dementia. A case study approach using student reflective writing and focus group data was used to explain quantitative results. Results: Twelve of the 20 items, the two sub-domains, and the overall Dementia Attitudes Scale showed significant improvement post-intervention. Qualitative analysis identified four themes that added insight to quantitative results: (a) expressions of fear and discomfort felt before storytelling, (b) comfort experienced during storytelling, (c) creativity and openness achieved through storytelling, and (d) humanistic perspectives developed during storytelling can influence future patient care. Conclusions: This study provides preliminary evidence that participation in a creative storytelling program improves medical student attitudes towards persons with dementia, and suggests mechanisms for why attitudinal changes occurred.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)318-329
Number of pages12
JournalDementia
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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dementia
medical student
human being
attitude scale
participation
geriatrics
patient care
creativity
student
Mixed Methods
Medical Students
Person
Storytelling
Dementia
art
anxiety
learning
evidence
education
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

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How a creative storytelling intervention can improve medical student attitude towards persons with dementia : A mixed methods study. / George, Daniel; Stuckey, Heather; Whitehead, Megan M.

In: Dementia, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 318-329.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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