How direct-to-consumer television advertising for osteoarthritis drugs affects physicians' prescribing behavior

W. David Bradford, Andrew N. Kleit, Paul J. Nietert, Terrence Steyer, Thomas McIlwain, Steven Ornstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Concern about the potential pernicious effect of direct-to-consumer (DTC) drug advertising on physicians' prescribing patterns was heightened with the 2004 withdrawal of Vioxx, a heavily advertised treatment for osteoarthritis. We examine how DTC advertising has affected physicians' prescribing behavior for osteoarthritis patients. We analyzed monthly clinical information on fifty-seven primary care practices during 2000-2002, matched to monthly brand-specific advertising data for local and network television. DTC advertising of Vioxx and Celebrex increased the number of osteoarthritis patients seen by physicians each month. DTC advertising of Vioxx increased the likelihood that patients received both Vioxx and Celebrex, but Celebrex ads only affected Vioxx use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1371-1377
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 9 2006

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Celecoxib
Television
Osteoarthritis
Physicians
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Physicians' Practice Patterns
Primary Health Care
rofecoxib
Direct-to-Consumer Advertising

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Bradford, W. David ; Kleit, Andrew N. ; Nietert, Paul J. ; Steyer, Terrence ; McIlwain, Thomas ; Ornstein, Steven. / How direct-to-consumer television advertising for osteoarthritis drugs affects physicians' prescribing behavior. In: Health Affairs. 2006 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 1371-1377.
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How direct-to-consumer television advertising for osteoarthritis drugs affects physicians' prescribing behavior. / Bradford, W. David; Kleit, Andrew N.; Nietert, Paul J.; Steyer, Terrence; McIlwain, Thomas; Ornstein, Steven.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. 25, No. 5, 09.10.2006, p. 1371-1377.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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