How Do Visual Representations Influence Survey Responses? Evidence from a Choice Experiment on Landscape Attributes of Green Infrastructure

Yau Huo (Jimmy) Shr, Richard Ready, Brian Orland, Stuart Patton Echols

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article provides new evidence on how images influence survey responses, using a split-sample choice experiment. Our results suggest that, when respondents are presented with both images and text, they exhibit stronger preferences for attributes with high visual salience than when presented with either images or text alone. Furthermore, respondents are less likely to ignore individual attributes when both images and text are provided. However, the provision of images makes responses more random, i.e., respondents' preferences for attributes are less consistent across choice questions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-386
Number of pages12
JournalEcological Economics
Volume156
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

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infrastructure
experiment
attribute
Choice experiment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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How Do Visual Representations Influence Survey Responses? Evidence from a Choice Experiment on Landscape Attributes of Green Infrastructure. / Shr, Yau Huo (Jimmy); Ready, Richard; Orland, Brian; Echols, Stuart Patton.

In: Ecological Economics, Vol. 156, 01.02.2019, p. 375-386.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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