How employment affects women's gender attitudes. The workplace as a locus of contextual effects

Lee Ann Banaszak, Jan E. Leighley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores how women's employment context affects their attitudes towards the women's movement. Previous research finds a relationship between employment and gender attitudes. We examine three mechanisms which might account for this relationship: the social status of some occupations provides specific benefits which cause women to adopt more non-traditional attitudes; employment experiences such as entering the workforce and working in a non-traditional occupation increase feminist attitudes; and, the social networks and context acquired through employment alter traditional sex-role attitudes. A regression analysis of survey data from South Bend, Indiana, finds that experiences in male-dominated jobs and social networks with employed women significantly increase support for the women's movement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)174-185
Number of pages12
JournalPolitical Geography Quarterly
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

Fingerprint

womens employment
workplace
gender
social network
women's movement
occupation
sex role
social status
employment relationship
women's employment
regression analysis
experience
effect
woman
Contextual Effects
Locus
Work Place
cause
Women's Movement
Social Networks

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

@article{a9c024907f51478b85d4a11e59b5d0f5,
title = "How employment affects women's gender attitudes. The workplace as a locus of contextual effects",
abstract = "This paper explores how women's employment context affects their attitudes towards the women's movement. Previous research finds a relationship between employment and gender attitudes. We examine three mechanisms which might account for this relationship: the social status of some occupations provides specific benefits which cause women to adopt more non-traditional attitudes; employment experiences such as entering the workforce and working in a non-traditional occupation increase feminist attitudes; and, the social networks and context acquired through employment alter traditional sex-role attitudes. A regression analysis of survey data from South Bend, Indiana, finds that experiences in male-dominated jobs and social networks with employed women significantly increase support for the women's movement.",
author = "Banaszak, {Lee Ann} and Leighley, {Jan E.}",
year = "1991",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0260-9827(91)90019-Q",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "174--185",
journal = "Political Geography",
issn = "0962-6298",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "2",

}

How employment affects women's gender attitudes. The workplace as a locus of contextual effects. / Banaszak, Lee Ann; Leighley, Jan E.

In: Political Geography Quarterly, Vol. 10, No. 2, 01.01.1991, p. 174-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - How employment affects women's gender attitudes. The workplace as a locus of contextual effects

AU - Banaszak, Lee Ann

AU - Leighley, Jan E.

PY - 1991/1/1

Y1 - 1991/1/1

N2 - This paper explores how women's employment context affects their attitudes towards the women's movement. Previous research finds a relationship between employment and gender attitudes. We examine three mechanisms which might account for this relationship: the social status of some occupations provides specific benefits which cause women to adopt more non-traditional attitudes; employment experiences such as entering the workforce and working in a non-traditional occupation increase feminist attitudes; and, the social networks and context acquired through employment alter traditional sex-role attitudes. A regression analysis of survey data from South Bend, Indiana, finds that experiences in male-dominated jobs and social networks with employed women significantly increase support for the women's movement.

AB - This paper explores how women's employment context affects their attitudes towards the women's movement. Previous research finds a relationship between employment and gender attitudes. We examine three mechanisms which might account for this relationship: the social status of some occupations provides specific benefits which cause women to adopt more non-traditional attitudes; employment experiences such as entering the workforce and working in a non-traditional occupation increase feminist attitudes; and, the social networks and context acquired through employment alter traditional sex-role attitudes. A regression analysis of survey data from South Bend, Indiana, finds that experiences in male-dominated jobs and social networks with employed women significantly increase support for the women's movement.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0013505536&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0013505536&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0260-9827(91)90019-Q

DO - 10.1016/0260-9827(91)90019-Q

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 174

EP - 185

JO - Political Geography

JF - Political Geography

SN - 0962-6298

IS - 2

ER -