How engineering design students' creative preferences and cognitive styles impact their concept generation and screening

Katie Heininger, Hong En Chen, Kathryn Weed Jablokow, Scarlett Rae Miller

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The flow of creative ideas throughout the engineering design process is essential for innovation. However, few studies have examined how individual traits affect problem-solving behaviors in an engineering design setting. Understanding these behaviors will enable us to guide individuals during the idea generation and concept screening phases of the engineering design process and help support the flow of creative ideas through this process. As a first step towards understanding these behaviors, we conducted an exploratory study with 19 undergraduate engineering students to examine the impact of individual traits, using the Preferences for Creativity Scale (PCS) and Kirton's Adaption-Innovation inventory (KAI), on the creativity of the ideas generated and selected for an engineering design task. The ideas were rated for their creativity, quality, and originality using Amabile's consensual assessment technique. Our results show that the PCS was able to predict students' propensity for creative concept screening, accounting for 74% of the variation in the model. Specifically, team centrality and influence and risk tolerance significantly contributed to the model. However, PCS was unable to predict idea generation abilities. On the other hand, cognitive style, as measured by KAI, predicted the generation of creative and original ideas, as well as one's propensity for quality concept screening, although the effect sizes were small. Our results provide insights into individual factors impacting undergraduate engineering students' idea generation and selection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication30th International Conference on Design Theory and Methodology
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
ISBN (Electronic)9780791851845
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
EventASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2018 - Quebec City, Canada
Duration: Aug 26 2018Aug 29 2018

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Volume7

Other

OtherASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2018
CountryCanada
CityQuebec City
Period8/26/188/29/18

Fingerprint

Engineering Design
Screening
Students
Innovation
Design Process
Engineering
Predict
Effect Size
Centrality
Tolerance
Concepts
Creativity
Style
Model

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

Heininger, K., Chen, H. E., Jablokow, K. W., & Miller, S. R. (2018). How engineering design students' creative preferences and cognitive styles impact their concept generation and screening. In 30th International Conference on Design Theory and Methodology (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 7). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2018-85942
Heininger, Katie ; Chen, Hong En ; Jablokow, Kathryn Weed ; Miller, Scarlett Rae. / How engineering design students' creative preferences and cognitive styles impact their concept generation and screening. 30th International Conference on Design Theory and Methodology. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2018. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference).
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Heininger, K, Chen, HE, Jablokow, KW & Miller, SR 2018, How engineering design students' creative preferences and cognitive styles impact their concept generation and screening. in 30th International Conference on Design Theory and Methodology. Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference, vol. 7, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2018, Quebec City, Canada, 8/26/18. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2018-85942

How engineering design students' creative preferences and cognitive styles impact their concept generation and screening. / Heininger, Katie; Chen, Hong En; Jablokow, Kathryn Weed; Miller, Scarlett Rae.

30th International Conference on Design Theory and Methodology. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2018. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 7).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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ER -

Heininger K, Chen HE, Jablokow KW, Miller SR. How engineering design students' creative preferences and cognitive styles impact their concept generation and screening. In 30th International Conference on Design Theory and Methodology. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2018. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2018-85942