How justice can affect jury: Training abstract words promotes generalisation to concrete words in patients with aphasia

Chaleece Sandberg, Swathi Kiran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Developing language treatments that not only improve trained items but also promote generalisation to untrained items is a major focus in aphasia research. This study is a replication and extension of previous work which found that training abstract words in a particular context-category promotes generalisation to concrete words but not vice versa (Kiran, Sandberg, & Abbott, 2009). Twelve persons with aphasia (five female) with varying types and degrees of severity participated in a generative naming treatment based on the Complexity Account of Treatment Efficacy (CATE; Thompson, Shapiro, Kiran, & Sobecks, 2003). All participants were trained to generate abstract words in a particular context-category by analysing the semantic features of the target words. Two other context-categories were used as controls. Ten of the twelve participants improved on the trained abstract words in the trained context-category. Eight of the ten participants who responded to treatment also generalised to concrete words in the same context-category. These results suggest that this treatment is both efficacious and efficient. We discuss possible mechanisms of training and generalisation effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)738-769
Number of pages32
JournalNeuropsychological Rehabilitation
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 3 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Rehabilitation
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology

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