How reading to children influences children’s memory development

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter uses a novel approach to understanding the benefits of reading to young children-a memory approach. After a brief review of the benefits of reading to children on emerging literacy, memory concepts are introduced along with a description of the development of episodic memory, semantic memory, and procedural memory. The memory approach to understanding the benefits of reading to children is then outlined. Ways in which reading to young children influences episodic, semantic, and procedural memory development are described. These include the roles of language development, scripts and schemas, questioning style, vocabulary, knowledge base, automaticity, decontextualized language, and implicit memory in the development of children’s memory processes. Finally, suggestions for ways to read to children in order to optimize their memory development are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEarly Childhood Education
Subtitle of host publicationIssues and Developments
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages157-169
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9781608765690
ISBN (Print)9781604563795
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

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semantics
language
vocabulary
literacy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Barry, E. S. (2008). How reading to children influences children’s memory development. In Early Childhood Education: Issues and Developments (pp. 157-169). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..
Barry, Elaine Shannon. / How reading to children influences children’s memory development. Early Childhood Education: Issues and Developments. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2008. pp. 157-169
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Barry, ES 2008, How reading to children influences children’s memory development. in Early Childhood Education: Issues and Developments. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 157-169.

How reading to children influences children’s memory development. / Barry, Elaine Shannon.

Early Childhood Education: Issues and Developments. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2008. p. 157-169.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Barry ES. How reading to children influences children’s memory development. In Early Childhood Education: Issues and Developments. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2008. p. 157-169