How should clinicians address a parent’s false belief generated by denial or grief about how to care well for a child?

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Parents of children with complex health needs are often both vigilant and very knowledgeable about their child’s disease state. That said, sometimes parents’ hyperfocus, combined with their strong emotional attachment, can result in both false beliefs regarding their child’s capacities and disagreements with clinicians about what is and is not clinically indicated. We examine ethical and professional responsibilities clinicians should consider when working with parents who hold false beliefs about their child with complex health needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1017-1024
Number of pages8
JournalAMA Journal of Ethics
Volume20
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2018

Fingerprint

Grief
grief
parents
Parents
Health
health
Disease
responsibility
Denial (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

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title = "How should clinicians address a parent’s false belief generated by denial or grief about how to care well for a child?",
abstract = "Parents of children with complex health needs are often both vigilant and very knowledgeable about their child’s disease state. That said, sometimes parents’ hyperfocus, combined with their strong emotional attachment, can result in both false beliefs regarding their child’s capacities and disagreements with clinicians about what is and is not clinically indicated. We examine ethical and professional responsibilities clinicians should consider when working with parents who hold false beliefs about their child with complex health needs.",
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