How should I regulate my emotions if I want to run faster?

Andrew M. Lane, Tracey J. Devonport, Andrew P. Friesen, Christopher J. Beedie, Christopher L. Fullerton, Damian M. Stanley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study investigated the effects of emotion regulation strategies on self-reported emotions and 1600 m track running performance. In stage 1 of a three-stage study, participants (N = 15) reported emotional states associated with best, worst and ideal performance. Results indicated that a best and ideal emotional state for performance composed of feeling happy, calm, energetic and moderately anxious whereas the worst emotional state for performance composed of feeling downhearted, sluggish and highly anxious. In stage 2, emotion regulation interventions were developed using online material and supported by electronic feedback. One intervention motivated participants to increase the intensity of unpleasant emotions (e.g. feel more angry and anxious). A second intervention motivated participants to reduce the intensity of unpleasant emotions (e.g. feel less angry and anxious). In stage 3, using a repeated measures design, participants used each intervention before running a 1600 m time trial. Data were compared with a no treatment control condition. The intervention designed to increase the intensity of unpleasant emotions resulted in higher anxiety and lower calmness scores but no significant effects on 1600 m running time. The intervention designed to reduce the intensity of unpleasant emotions was associated with significantly slower times for the first 400 m. We suggest future research should investigate emotion regulation, emotion and performance using quasi-experimental methods with performance measures that are meaningful to participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)465-472
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Sport Science
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 18 2016

Fingerprint

Emotions
Anxiety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Lane, A. M., Devonport, T. J., Friesen, A. P., Beedie, C. J., Fullerton, C. L., & Stanley, D. M. (2016). How should I regulate my emotions if I want to run faster? European Journal of Sport Science, 16(4), 465-472. https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2015.1080305
Lane, Andrew M. ; Devonport, Tracey J. ; Friesen, Andrew P. ; Beedie, Christopher J. ; Fullerton, Christopher L. ; Stanley, Damian M. / How should I regulate my emotions if I want to run faster?. In: European Journal of Sport Science. 2016 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 465-472.
@article{6f0c059886a242e9a9c0fdf009498274,
title = "How should I regulate my emotions if I want to run faster?",
abstract = "The present study investigated the effects of emotion regulation strategies on self-reported emotions and 1600 m track running performance. In stage 1 of a three-stage study, participants (N = 15) reported emotional states associated with best, worst and ideal performance. Results indicated that a best and ideal emotional state for performance composed of feeling happy, calm, energetic and moderately anxious whereas the worst emotional state for performance composed of feeling downhearted, sluggish and highly anxious. In stage 2, emotion regulation interventions were developed using online material and supported by electronic feedback. One intervention motivated participants to increase the intensity of unpleasant emotions (e.g. feel more angry and anxious). A second intervention motivated participants to reduce the intensity of unpleasant emotions (e.g. feel less angry and anxious). In stage 3, using a repeated measures design, participants used each intervention before running a 1600 m time trial. Data were compared with a no treatment control condition. The intervention designed to increase the intensity of unpleasant emotions resulted in higher anxiety and lower calmness scores but no significant effects on 1600 m running time. The intervention designed to reduce the intensity of unpleasant emotions was associated with significantly slower times for the first 400 m. We suggest future research should investigate emotion regulation, emotion and performance using quasi-experimental methods with performance measures that are meaningful to participants.",
author = "Lane, {Andrew M.} and Devonport, {Tracey J.} and Friesen, {Andrew P.} and Beedie, {Christopher J.} and Fullerton, {Christopher L.} and Stanley, {Damian M.}",
year = "2016",
month = "5",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1080/17461391.2015.1080305",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "465--472",
journal = "European Journal of Sport Science",
issn = "1746-1391",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

Lane, AM, Devonport, TJ, Friesen, AP, Beedie, CJ, Fullerton, CL & Stanley, DM 2016, 'How should I regulate my emotions if I want to run faster?', European Journal of Sport Science, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 465-472. https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2015.1080305

How should I regulate my emotions if I want to run faster? / Lane, Andrew M.; Devonport, Tracey J.; Friesen, Andrew P.; Beedie, Christopher J.; Fullerton, Christopher L.; Stanley, Damian M.

In: European Journal of Sport Science, Vol. 16, No. 4, 18.05.2016, p. 465-472.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - How should I regulate my emotions if I want to run faster?

AU - Lane, Andrew M.

AU - Devonport, Tracey J.

AU - Friesen, Andrew P.

AU - Beedie, Christopher J.

AU - Fullerton, Christopher L.

AU - Stanley, Damian M.

PY - 2016/5/18

Y1 - 2016/5/18

N2 - The present study investigated the effects of emotion regulation strategies on self-reported emotions and 1600 m track running performance. In stage 1 of a three-stage study, participants (N = 15) reported emotional states associated with best, worst and ideal performance. Results indicated that a best and ideal emotional state for performance composed of feeling happy, calm, energetic and moderately anxious whereas the worst emotional state for performance composed of feeling downhearted, sluggish and highly anxious. In stage 2, emotion regulation interventions were developed using online material and supported by electronic feedback. One intervention motivated participants to increase the intensity of unpleasant emotions (e.g. feel more angry and anxious). A second intervention motivated participants to reduce the intensity of unpleasant emotions (e.g. feel less angry and anxious). In stage 3, using a repeated measures design, participants used each intervention before running a 1600 m time trial. Data were compared with a no treatment control condition. The intervention designed to increase the intensity of unpleasant emotions resulted in higher anxiety and lower calmness scores but no significant effects on 1600 m running time. The intervention designed to reduce the intensity of unpleasant emotions was associated with significantly slower times for the first 400 m. We suggest future research should investigate emotion regulation, emotion and performance using quasi-experimental methods with performance measures that are meaningful to participants.

AB - The present study investigated the effects of emotion regulation strategies on self-reported emotions and 1600 m track running performance. In stage 1 of a three-stage study, participants (N = 15) reported emotional states associated with best, worst and ideal performance. Results indicated that a best and ideal emotional state for performance composed of feeling happy, calm, energetic and moderately anxious whereas the worst emotional state for performance composed of feeling downhearted, sluggish and highly anxious. In stage 2, emotion regulation interventions were developed using online material and supported by electronic feedback. One intervention motivated participants to increase the intensity of unpleasant emotions (e.g. feel more angry and anxious). A second intervention motivated participants to reduce the intensity of unpleasant emotions (e.g. feel less angry and anxious). In stage 3, using a repeated measures design, participants used each intervention before running a 1600 m time trial. Data were compared with a no treatment control condition. The intervention designed to increase the intensity of unpleasant emotions resulted in higher anxiety and lower calmness scores but no significant effects on 1600 m running time. The intervention designed to reduce the intensity of unpleasant emotions was associated with significantly slower times for the first 400 m. We suggest future research should investigate emotion regulation, emotion and performance using quasi-experimental methods with performance measures that are meaningful to participants.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84941253514&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84941253514&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/17461391.2015.1080305

DO - 10.1080/17461391.2015.1080305

M3 - Article

C2 - 26361078

AN - SCOPUS:84941253514

VL - 16

SP - 465

EP - 472

JO - European Journal of Sport Science

JF - European Journal of Sport Science

SN - 1746-1391

IS - 4

ER -