How spacing of data collection may impact estimates of substance use trajectories

Xianming Tan, Lisa Dierker, Jennifer Rose, Runze Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The goal of this study is to provide an empirical example using longitudinal cigarette smoking data that compares results of growth mixture trajectory models on the basis of contiguous and snapshot measurements. Data were drawn from an intensive longitudinal study of college freshman (N = 905) with a previous history of smoking. Participants provided weekly smoking reports for 35 consecutive weeks. We found that using contiguous weekly data (35 waves) or 6-wave or 4-wave snapshot data provided similar trajectory curves and proportions. However, there were notable differences in individual trajectory assignments on the basis of contiguous and snapshot measurements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)758-768
Number of pages11
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 7 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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