How to Make a Living by Exhaling Methane

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methane produced in the biosphere is derived from twomajor pathways. Conversion of the methyl group of acetate to CH4 in the aceticlastic pathway accounts for at least two-thirds, and reduction of CO2 with electrons derived from H2, formate, or CO accounts for approximately one-third. Although both pathways have terminal steps in common, they diverge considerably in the initial steps and energy conservation mechanisms. Steps and enzymes unique to the CO2 reduction pathway are confined to methanogens and the domain Archaea. On the other hand, steps and enzymes unique to the aceticlastic pathway are widely distributed in the domain Bacteria, the understanding of which has contributed to a broader understanding of prokaryotic biology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)453-473
Number of pages21
JournalAnnual Review of Microbiology
Volume64
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 13 2010

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Exhalation
formic acid
Methane
Archaea
Enzymes
Carbon Monoxide
Electrons
Bacteria
methyl acetate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology

Cite this

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title = "How to Make a Living by Exhaling Methane",
abstract = "Methane produced in the biosphere is derived from twomajor pathways. Conversion of the methyl group of acetate to CH4 in the aceticlastic pathway accounts for at least two-thirds, and reduction of CO2 with electrons derived from H2, formate, or CO accounts for approximately one-third. Although both pathways have terminal steps in common, they diverge considerably in the initial steps and energy conservation mechanisms. Steps and enzymes unique to the CO2 reduction pathway are confined to methanogens and the domain Archaea. On the other hand, steps and enzymes unique to the aceticlastic pathway are widely distributed in the domain Bacteria, the understanding of which has contributed to a broader understanding of prokaryotic biology.",
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How to Make a Living by Exhaling Methane. / Ferry, James Gregory.

In: Annual Review of Microbiology, Vol. 64, 13.10.2010, p. 453-473.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T1 - How to Make a Living by Exhaling Methane

AU - Ferry, James Gregory

PY - 2010/10/13

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N2 - Methane produced in the biosphere is derived from twomajor pathways. Conversion of the methyl group of acetate to CH4 in the aceticlastic pathway accounts for at least two-thirds, and reduction of CO2 with electrons derived from H2, formate, or CO accounts for approximately one-third. Although both pathways have terminal steps in common, they diverge considerably in the initial steps and energy conservation mechanisms. Steps and enzymes unique to the CO2 reduction pathway are confined to methanogens and the domain Archaea. On the other hand, steps and enzymes unique to the aceticlastic pathway are widely distributed in the domain Bacteria, the understanding of which has contributed to a broader understanding of prokaryotic biology.

AB - Methane produced in the biosphere is derived from twomajor pathways. Conversion of the methyl group of acetate to CH4 in the aceticlastic pathway accounts for at least two-thirds, and reduction of CO2 with electrons derived from H2, formate, or CO accounts for approximately one-third. Although both pathways have terminal steps in common, they diverge considerably in the initial steps and energy conservation mechanisms. Steps and enzymes unique to the CO2 reduction pathway are confined to methanogens and the domain Archaea. On the other hand, steps and enzymes unique to the aceticlastic pathway are widely distributed in the domain Bacteria, the understanding of which has contributed to a broader understanding of prokaryotic biology.

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