Human and relational capital behind the structural power of CEOs in Chinese listed firms

Wenxi Yan, Eduardo Schiehll, Maureen Isobel Muller-Kahle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examines the human and relational capital attributes that enable Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) to acquire structural power in Chinese listed firms, and whether gender differences intervene in the attributes that explain this structural power. We show that CEOs with elite education, longer years of education and work experience and more outside directorships are more likely to gain structural power in Chinese listed firms. However, female CEOs are less likely than male CEOs to achieve similar structural power, while only outside directorships, as a proxy for relational capital, compensate for this gender inequality. Employing human capital theory, our study advances the knowledge on CEO leadership by revealing the role of human and relational attributes to explain CEO structural power. Further, our study provides new insights about upward mobility and gender inequality in a fast emerging economy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)715-743
Number of pages29
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Management
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2019

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Human capital
Relational capital
Chief executive officer
Education
Gender inequality
Emerging economies
Gender differences
Elites
Human capital theory
Work experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

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Human and relational capital behind the structural power of CEOs in Chinese listed firms. / Yan, Wenxi; Schiehll, Eduardo; Muller-Kahle, Maureen Isobel.

In: Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Vol. 36, No. 3, 15.09.2019, p. 715-743.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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