Human behavioral ecology, domestic animals, and land use during the transition to agriculture in Valencia, eastern Spain

Sarah B. McClure, Michael A. Jochim, C. Michael Barton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Most applications of Human Behavioral Ecology (HBE) to questions of agricultural origins have focused on plant domestication in archaeological contexts in the New World, where domestic animals were generally less important in early agricultural societies. In contrast, domestic animals play an important part in subsistence strategies and land use in Old World early agricultural societies. In this chapter, we examine the role of domestic animals in changes of land use during the transition to, and consolidation of, food producing economies in Valencia, Spain. Using the behavioral ecological model of ideal free distribution as a heuristic concept, we show the tight linkage between agricultural subsistence strategies, herd management, and long-term dynamics of human land use. Two broadly different herd management strategies were stable for long periods of time and the shift from one to the other was tightly linked with socioecological changes during the Neolithic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBehavioral Ecology and the Transition to Agriculture
PublisherUniversity of California Press
Pages197-216
Number of pages20
ISBN (Print)0520246470, 9780520246478
StatePublished - Jan 2 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Human behavioral ecology, domestic animals, and land use during the transition to agriculture in Valencia, eastern Spain'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    McClure, S. B., Jochim, M. A., & Barton, C. M. (2006). Human behavioral ecology, domestic animals, and land use during the transition to agriculture in Valencia, eastern Spain. In Behavioral Ecology and the Transition to Agriculture (pp. 197-216). University of California Press.