Human cognitive and perceptual factors in JDL level 4 hard / soft data fusion

Jeffrey C. Rimland, David L. Hall, Jacob L. Graham

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Utilization of human participants as "soft sensors" is becoming increasingly important for gathering information related to a wide range of phenomena including natural and man-made disasters, environmental changes over time, crime prevention, and other roles of the "citizen scientist." The ubiquity of advanced mobile devices is facilitating the role of humans as "hybrid sensor platforms", allowing them to gather data (e.g. video, still images, GPS coordinates), annotate it based on their intuitive human understanding, and upload it using existing infrastructure and social networks. However, this new paradigm presents many challenges related to source characterization, effective tasking, and utilization of massive quantities of physical sensor, human-based, and hybrid hard/soft data in a manner that facilitates decision making instead of simply amplifying information overload. In the Joint Directors of Laboratories (JDL) data fusion process model, "level 4" fusion is a meta-process that attempts to improve performance of the entire fusion system through effective source utilization. While there are well-defined approaches for tasking and categorizing physical sensors, these methods fall short when attempting to effectively utilize a hybrid group of physical sensors and human observers. While physical sensor characterization can rely on statistical models of performance (e.g. accuracy, reliability, specificity, etc.) under given conditions, "soft" sensors add the additional challenges of characterizing human performance, tasking without inducing bias, and effectively balancing strengths and weaknesses of both human and physical sensors. This paper addresses the challenges of the evolving human-centric fusion paradigm and presents cognitive, perceptual, and other human factors that help to understand, categorize, and augment the roles and capabilities of humans as observers in hybrid systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMultisensor, Multisource Information Fusion: Architectures, Algorithms, and Applications 2012
Volume8407
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
EventMultisensor, Multisource Information Fusion: Architectures, Algorithms, and Applications 2012 - Baltimore, MD, United States
Duration: Apr 25 2012Apr 26 2012

Other

OtherMultisensor, Multisource Information Fusion: Architectures, Algorithms, and Applications 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore, MD
Period4/25/124/26/12

Fingerprint

multisensor fusion
Data Fusion
Data fusion
sensors
Sensors
Sensor
Soft Sensor
Fusion
fusion
Observer
Hybrid sensors
Paradigm
human performance
crime
Crime
video data
Human Performance
Human engineering
Human
Human Factors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Rimland, J. C., Hall, D. L., & Graham, J. L. (2012). Human cognitive and perceptual factors in JDL level 4 hard / soft data fusion. In Multisensor, Multisource Information Fusion: Architectures, Algorithms, and Applications 2012 (Vol. 8407). [84070R] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.919220
Rimland, Jeffrey C. ; Hall, David L. ; Graham, Jacob L. / Human cognitive and perceptual factors in JDL level 4 hard / soft data fusion. Multisensor, Multisource Information Fusion: Architectures, Algorithms, and Applications 2012. Vol. 8407 2012.
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abstract = "Utilization of human participants as {"}soft sensors{"} is becoming increasingly important for gathering information related to a wide range of phenomena including natural and man-made disasters, environmental changes over time, crime prevention, and other roles of the {"}citizen scientist.{"} The ubiquity of advanced mobile devices is facilitating the role of humans as {"}hybrid sensor platforms{"}, allowing them to gather data (e.g. video, still images, GPS coordinates), annotate it based on their intuitive human understanding, and upload it using existing infrastructure and social networks. However, this new paradigm presents many challenges related to source characterization, effective tasking, and utilization of massive quantities of physical sensor, human-based, and hybrid hard/soft data in a manner that facilitates decision making instead of simply amplifying information overload. In the Joint Directors of Laboratories (JDL) data fusion process model, {"}level 4{"} fusion is a meta-process that attempts to improve performance of the entire fusion system through effective source utilization. While there are well-defined approaches for tasking and categorizing physical sensors, these methods fall short when attempting to effectively utilize a hybrid group of physical sensors and human observers. While physical sensor characterization can rely on statistical models of performance (e.g. accuracy, reliability, specificity, etc.) under given conditions, {"}soft{"} sensors add the additional challenges of characterizing human performance, tasking without inducing bias, and effectively balancing strengths and weaknesses of both human and physical sensors. This paper addresses the challenges of the evolving human-centric fusion paradigm and presents cognitive, perceptual, and other human factors that help to understand, categorize, and augment the roles and capabilities of humans as observers in hybrid systems.",
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Rimland, JC, Hall, DL & Graham, JL 2012, Human cognitive and perceptual factors in JDL level 4 hard / soft data fusion. in Multisensor, Multisource Information Fusion: Architectures, Algorithms, and Applications 2012. vol. 8407, 84070R, Multisensor, Multisource Information Fusion: Architectures, Algorithms, and Applications 2012, Baltimore, MD, United States, 4/25/12. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.919220

Human cognitive and perceptual factors in JDL level 4 hard / soft data fusion. / Rimland, Jeffrey C.; Hall, David L.; Graham, Jacob L.

Multisensor, Multisource Information Fusion: Architectures, Algorithms, and Applications 2012. Vol. 8407 2012. 84070R.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Rimland JC, Hall DL, Graham JL. Human cognitive and perceptual factors in JDL level 4 hard / soft data fusion. In Multisensor, Multisource Information Fusion: Architectures, Algorithms, and Applications 2012. Vol. 8407. 2012. 84070R https://doi.org/10.1117/12.919220