Human-GIS interaction issues in crisis response

Guoray Cai, Rajeev Sharma, Alan M. MacEachren, Isaac Brewer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Geospatial information systems (GIS) provide a central infrastructure for computer supported crisis management in terms of database, analytical models and visualisation tools, but the user interfaces of such systems are still hard to use, and do not address the special needs of crisis managers who often work in teams and make judgements and decisions under stress. This paper articulates the overall challenges for effective GIS interfaces to support crisis management in three dimensions: immediacy, relevance and sharing. These three requirements are addressed by an integrated approach, taking a human-GIS interaction perspective. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, we cite our prototype system, DAVE_G (Dialogue-Assisted Visual Environment for Geoinformaton), as an example. DAVE_G uses a large screen display to create a shared workspace among team members, and allows risk managers to interact with a GIS through natural multimodal (speech/gesture) dialogues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)388-407
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Risk Assessment and Management
Volume6
Issue number4-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 16 2006

Fingerprint

Information Systems
Interaction
Dialogue Systems
Workspace
Gesture
Analytical Model
User Interface
Three-dimension
Sharing
Visualization
Infrastructure
Prototype
Crisis
Human
Crisis response
Information systems
Requirements
Demonstrate
Vision
Dialogue

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Management Science and Operations Research

Cite this

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Human-GIS interaction issues in crisis response. / Cai, Guoray; Sharma, Rajeev; MacEachren, Alan M.; Brewer, Isaac.

In: International Journal of Risk Assessment and Management, Vol. 6, No. 4-6, 16.06.2006, p. 388-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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