Human norovirus surrogate reduction in milk and juice blends by high pressure homogenization

Katie Marie Horm, Federico Miguel Harte, Doris Helen D'Souza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Novel processing technologies such as high pressure homogenization (HPH) for the inactivation of foodborne viruses in fluids that retain nutritional attributes are in high demand. The objectives of this research were (i) to determine the effects of HPH alone or with an emulsifier (lecithin) on human norovirus surrogates-murine norovirus (MNV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCVF9)- in skim milk and orange juice, and (ii) to determine HPH effects on FCV-F9 and MNV-1 in orange and pomegranate juice blends. Experiments were conducted in duplicate at 0, 100, 200, 250, and 300 MPa for < 2 s and plaque was assayed in duplicate. In milk, FCV-F9 was reduced by ≥4 and ∼1.3 log PFU/ml at 300 and 250 MPa, respectively, and ≥4- and ∼1-log PFU/ml reductions were obtained in orange juice at 300 and 250 MPa, respectively. In orange juice or milk combined with lecithin, FCVF9 was reduced to nondetectable levels at 300 MPa, and by 1.77 and 0.78 log PFU/ml at 250 MPa. MNV-1 in milk was reduced by ∼1.3 log PFU/ml only at 300 MPa, and by ∼0.8 and ∼0.4 log PFU/ml in orange juice at 300 and 250 MPa, respectively. MNV-1 in milk or orange juice containing lecithin at 300 MPa showed 1.32- and 2.5-log PFU/ml reductions, respectively. In the pomegranate-orange juice blend, FCV-F9 was completely reduced, and MNV-1 was reduced by 1.04 and 1.78 log PFU/ml at 250 and 300 MPa, respectively. These results show that HPH has potential for commercial use to inactivate foodborne virus surrogates in juices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1984-1990
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Food Protection
Volume75
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Microbiology

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