Human or superhuman: Individual differences in the perception of technomorphism

Heather C. Lum, William J. Shelstad, Megan H. Harris, Matthew M. White

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Traditionally, robotics are created to be user friendly from a human standpoint but recently a different theory has emerged which focuses on how the technology we use may influence how human-like we perceive each other to be. This study investigates how individual differences play in to someone's propensity to technomorphize. The first focus was on whether those in an engineering or programming field were more likely to technomorphize than those in other fields. The second focus was to continue the validation process for the technomorphism scale and examine how machine-like humans may be perceived. Results from this study showed that those in an engineering field or programming field are more likely to technomorphize than those in different fields.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2014 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages1424-1428
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289456
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Event58th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 - Chicago, United States
Duration: Oct 27 2014Oct 31 2014

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2014-January
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other58th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
CountryUnited States
CityChicago
Period10/27/1410/31/14

Fingerprint

programming
engineering
Robotics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Lum, H. C., Shelstad, W. J., Harris, M. H., & White, M. M. (2014). Human or superhuman: Individual differences in the perception of technomorphism. In 2014 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 (pp. 1424-1428). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2014-January). Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931214581297
Lum, Heather C. ; Shelstad, William J. ; Harris, Megan H. ; White, Matthew M. / Human or superhuman : Individual differences in the perception of technomorphism. 2014 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014. Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., 2014. pp. 1424-1428 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society).
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Lum, HC, Shelstad, WJ, Harris, MH & White, MM 2014, Human or superhuman: Individual differences in the perception of technomorphism. in 2014 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, vol. 2014-January, Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., pp. 1424-1428, 58th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014, Chicago, United States, 10/27/14. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931214581297

Human or superhuman : Individual differences in the perception of technomorphism. / Lum, Heather C.; Shelstad, William J.; Harris, Megan H.; White, Matthew M.

2014 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014. Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., 2014. p. 1424-1428 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2014-January).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Lum HC, Shelstad WJ, Harris MH, White MM. Human or superhuman: Individual differences in the perception of technomorphism. In 2014 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014. Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc. 2014. p. 1424-1428. (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society). https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931214581297