Human values and ideological beliefs as predictors of attitudes toward immigrants across 20 countries: The country-level moderating role of threat

Rafaella de C.R. Araújo, Magdalena Bobowik, Roosevelt Vilar, James H. Liu, Homero Gil de Zuñiga, Larissa Kus-Harbord, Nadezhda Lebedeva, Valdiney V. Gouveia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Immigration is a worldwide subject of interest, and studies about attitudes toward immigrants have been frequent due to immigration crises in different locations across the globe. We aimed at understanding individual-level effects of human values and ideological beliefs (Right-Wing Authoritarianism—RWA, and Social Dominance Orientation—SDO) on attitudes toward immigrants, and whether country-level variables (perception of Islamic fundamentalism as a threat, perception of immigrants as a threat, and international migrant stock) moderate these relations. With representative samples from 20 countries (N = 21,362; the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Oceania), and using Multilevel Bayesian regressions, results showed the negative effect of RWA, SDO, and existence values on attitudes toward immigrants, and the positive effects of suprapersonal and interactive values. Cross-level interactions indicated that the effects of RWA, SDO, and suprapersonal and existence values were intensified in countries with societally high levels of perceiving Islamic fundamentalism as a threat. International migrant stock served as a country-level moderator for the effects of SDO and RWA only. When country-level moderators were included simultaneously, Islamic fundamentalism as a threat was the most consistent moderator. Framing theory is offered as a plausible explanation of these results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)534-546
Number of pages13
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

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