Humans to robots: How technomorphic features shape our perceptions of each other

Heather C. Lum, Valerie K. Sims, Matthew G. Chin, Shane E. Halse, Megan A. Harris

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

It is becoming commonplace for humans to use technology to enhance and augment their understanding of the world. In this study, we investigated whether attention to these forms of technology can be predicted by scores on the Technomorphic Tendencies Scale (TTS) (Lum et al., 2011). Participants completed the TTS and were eye tracked while viewing pictures of models wearing various types of technological devices (e.g., an eye tracker; a Bluetooth headset). Higher TTS scorers tended to have more fixations and for a shorter duration of time when compared with the lower TTS Scorers. The Technomorphic Tendencies Scale is predictive of attention directed to technology when making first impressions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
Pages1534-1538
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
EventProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 22 2012Oct 26 2012

Other

OtherProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period10/22/1210/26/12

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robot
Robots
Bluetooth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Lum, H. C., Sims, V. K., Chin, M. G., Halse, S. E., & Harris, M. A. (2012). Humans to robots: How technomorphic features shape our perceptions of each other. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 (pp. 1534-1538) https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561305
Lum, Heather C. ; Sims, Valerie K. ; Chin, Matthew G. ; Halse, Shane E. ; Harris, Megan A. / Humans to robots : How technomorphic features shape our perceptions of each other. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. 2012. pp. 1534-1538
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Lum, HC, Sims, VK, Chin, MG, Halse, SE & Harris, MA 2012, Humans to robots: How technomorphic features shape our perceptions of each other. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. pp. 1534-1538, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012, Boston, MA, United States, 10/22/12. https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561305

Humans to robots : How technomorphic features shape our perceptions of each other. / Lum, Heather C.; Sims, Valerie K.; Chin, Matthew G.; Halse, Shane E.; Harris, Megan A.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. 2012. p. 1534-1538.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Lum HC, Sims VK, Chin MG, Halse SE, Harris MA. Humans to robots: How technomorphic features shape our perceptions of each other. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012. 2012. p. 1534-1538 https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561305